Articles Tagged ‘Twitter for business’

You’re Tweeting All Wrong: Twitter Tips for Small Business Owners

Monday, March 5th, 2012

First of all, I want to start by saying that there is not one way to use Twitter. Obviously, there are many types of Twitter accounts. There are celebrity profiles where thousands follow their favorite celeb’s every thoughts, national brands that celebrate the fans that love them, and even customer service accounts, where sometimes irate customers can rant or get advice on a recent experience with a company or service. But what about Twitter for small businesses?

New Chick to Twitter? Learn how to Fly Right.
If your small business has a Twitter account, what is the most effective way to post on Twitter for maximum effectiveness?

1) Start with a goal for Twitter: Is your goal simply for brand awareness? Are you seeking sign-ups for your e-newsletter? Selling a specific product? Filling seats for an event? Retail sales? Or simply to be seen as a resource or expert in your industry? Before you begin a Twitter strategy, really take the time to think about your goals for your business, and how Twitter might be able to take you there.

2) Who is your Audience? Twitter is a big world. In an ideal scenario, whom might you want to become a follower of your Twitter feed? Who might be a good source of information to share with your audience? What companies or individuals that sell to a similar audience or who are in your same industry are also on Twitter? Use the answers to these questions to guide you as you follow others and develop segments of Twitter users to watch and interact with.

3) Who will be the face of your Twitter account? For businesses, you have the option of having one company account on Twitter but also a personal account with your name and photo. If you are a solopreneur, it probably makes more sense to be the official “face” of your Twitter profile, with your company name but your photo on the account. Just remember to let your personality come out a bit and don’t just hide behind your brand. If you have multiple employees, you may want to consider letting your employees cross-promote your business profile through their feeds.

4) 80/20 Rule (at least): Keep your tweets 80 percent conversational or educational, and 20% promotional, at a minimum. If all you do is promote yourself, it will turn your followers off very quickly. It’s okay to provide a link to your latest blog post, new product offering, special discount, or press release, but make sure this is not all you are doing on Twitter. I have seen many accounts that only toot their own horn, and these profiles will not grow in popularity (unless of course, they are a deals site or have a sole purpose of notifying people of special deals).
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51% of Twitter Users Think Your Customer Service Stinks

Tuesday, October 25th, 2011

kylepic

I was reading the Martiz Research report on customer service and Twitter (thanks to Jay Baer for his post about the study) and I realized that despite the fact there were plenty of good statistics…

We may have missed a valid point.
The study shines a glaring light over companies who are ignoring Twitter as a customer service model. This happened to me recently. On Tuesday I had sent a tweet to Southwest (a complaint) and never received an answer. Jay points out that 70% of companies ignore customer service on Twitter.

I found something else in the study and I find it fairly disturbing. Yes, 70% of companies ignoring customer complaints on Twitter is disgusting. However, the study also found that 51% of respondents didn’t believe the company would actually answer them anyway.

This is a symptom to the overall problem of communication within the digital world. There is a great quote from Paul Greenburg that pretty much sums all this up.

“What I do care about is that you conclude that your company needs to change the way you deal with the customer NOW, because the customer has already changed the way they deal with you.”
Are we training the customer to not care? You may be great at customer service but this study isn’t speaking directly to your individual customer. It is giving you a good idea of what the consuming public thinks and how they act.

Three things to remember:

1. Research – You may be surprised how little you know about your customer database. Do you have the information you need to deliver quality customer service? Are you using Twitter and monitoring sites (like Google Alerts) to keep track of the conversation?

2. Systems – Use Hootsuite or CoTweet to enable your employees to respond to customer complaints on Twitter. They both have extremely valuable systems for answering and responding to Tweets of the positive or negative nature. Talk to your staff about the value of the system and what exactly should happen when a customer complaint is read.

3. Value – Try to setup metric to measure the value of the answers for employees and customers. Did the answer drive revenue? Did the lifetime value of the customer increase because of the answer via social media? We are all new to this world but in order to measure the right way… you need the right data.

kyle lacy
mindframe
(blog) www.kylelacy.com
(web) www.yourmindframe.com
(join) www.smallerindiana.com
(tweet) kyleplacy

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Should you be Tweeting?

Friday, September 2nd, 2011

The simple answer is yes, but keep reading to find out why. Lately, as I have been presenting some how-to classes I have discovered that a lot of people have heard of Twitter, but never actually used it so let me first explain what twitter is: in short, Twitter is a relationship-building and relationship maintenance tool. You send short micro-blogs (no more than 140 characters in length) to people who “follow” you. They can reply directly to you, or to everyone who is following both of you. This is great for people who don’t like to read long posts on Facebook or blogs. The key is being short and to the point.

The most obvious business use of Twitter is to meet potential customers and leads the same way you would at networking event or tradeshow. However, you can also use Twitter to accomplish the following marketing objectives:

1. Develop and promote your brand
2. Interact with your customer base
3. Track what people are saying about your company and brand
4. Create buzz around upcoming events
5. Help individual employees act as liaisons to the public
6. Promote other content you‘ve created, including webinars, blog posts or podcasts
7. Develop direct relationships with bloggers and journalists for potential PR placement
8. Generate sales leads for your business

As you can see, that is a ton of great marketing results from a small little tool like Twitter. In future weeks, I will take each of these marketing aspects and explore them in further detail.

If you are interested in some of the stats in regard to Twitter you can watch them at my video blog site: http://tv.boomerangresults.com/79/twitter-should-i-use-it/.

Neil Richmund
Boomerang Results Marketing
317-376-3535
neil@boomerangresults.com

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