Articles Tagged ‘Salesperson’

Sales Esteem

Monday, February 27th, 2012

What are you doing to build your Sales Esteem? The way you value yourself as a sales person?

There are three simple things you can do to build your Sales Esteem.

Change your Identity:

You change your perception of sales people. Sales people get a negative rep. People think of slick, faster talkers or used car salesmen. I always challenge people on their basic identities of sales people. I try to interject pioneer, frontiersmen, relationship catalyst, solution expert, match maker, life saver, bridge builder, disease stopper, expert, subject matter expert, facilitator, connector, economic driver, etc. All of the above things are true. What we choose to take on as an identify can effect our Sales Esteem.

Change your Scoreboard:

Instead of measuring your life in popularity or feedback, move it into controllable actions like calls, testimonials, connections, dispositions, RFP’s responded to or presentations delivered. Too many times we as sales people live on the highs and lows of the way we feel after a meeting rather than the real numbers that drive our business.

Change your Value:

Every service and product usually finds a competitor but people can always be an individual. You can always decide to be different from your competition even if your product or service isn’t. You can always be the one person that remembers birthdays, writes personal cards, sends great anniversary gifts, is an exceptional public speaker, builds networks for your clients, is genuinely interested in their family, is always positive, is always candid, is always great with follow-up, etc. In short, you can always add value to “YOU” as a person. You always be a player that separates yourself from your competition in the sales world.

Build your Sales Esteem and you will work your way through the sales funnel faster and with greater results. Best thing of all is it’s controlled by you!

Tony Scelzo
Rainmakers Marketing Group
317-216-6345
Tony@gorainmakers.com

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Great Salespeople Think Like Owners: 10 Ways To Make A Difference

Monday, October 17th, 2011

Making things happen takes action

Several weeks ago, I was conducting a sales seminar for designers and salespeople. Since I was the last speaker for the week, I asked the group what was their biggest challenge with the information they received. The answer: how will we implement these great ideas? You see the participants weren’t owners and couldn’t go back and immediately make changes. This wasn’t the first time I’ve heard this but this time I decided to add some sales strategies for the participants.

What good would all this information be if no one would listen?

1. So what do you do? First you must understand that if you’re selling customers you are an owner! Without you and your sales the business would die. Trust me, if you can’t sell anything you’ll be out the door and be replaced by someone who can sell. That’s how important you are.

2. Think like an owner. Being an owner and worked with many, I can tell you they think about money and sales. Without sales the business will not exist and a smart business owner puts as much money and time into training their sales staff. If you’ve been sent to a sales seminar consider it an honor and take it seriously. The owner has made an investment in your future. It means you are valued.

Your job? Rise to the occasion and learn as much as you can and be prepared to go back to your business and as they say: learn it, teach it and do it!

3. First things first. You’re probably excited and learned so many things you don’t know what to talk about first. Think like an owner and discuss the things that are connected to number 1. –sales and money. You will have learned lots of important things and many will stand out in your mind but are they the ones “most connected to the bottom line?” Are they ones you can implement easily, will they have the most impact on your business? Start with these things first. As someone once said, we’re learning how to be “mini moguls!”

4. Make sure it “makes sense.” Do you have the data right, do you have an example of how it gets done? If you need more info before you present your ideas, go get it right.

5. Make an appointment with the owner or manager who will be implementing your ideas and use rule 2. as one of your bargaining tools. “You sent me to these informative seminars, and there are ways that we can make more money and improve our sales. Who wouldn’t want to listen to this sales pitch? This will be the best sale you’ve ever had!
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None Of Us Want To Come In Second Place

Thursday, September 29th, 2011

It seems that General Motors Co. wants to tie their union-represented workers’ pay to their work performance. This will be a major shift in how generations of auto workers have been compensated.

“We are trying to give hourly workers the same metrics as salaried workers,” GM Vice Chairman Stephen Girsky said Tuesday at the Detroit auto show. “There is a big pay-for-performance element going through the company and there is going to be more of it.”GM wants more flexible pay levels for workers as a way to encourage better performance and avoid locking the company into handing out big raises when the company isn’t performing well, company executives say.

If they change the system they will be able to measure their employees success immediately. I believe they will also build more productive employees.

Does this work ?

The Federal Government tries it on and deals with the conflicts, http://bit.ly/ns3JI3

You can use pay or other incentives to increase output, http://bit.ly/oAuwN5

Incentives can be customized for employees, http://bit.ly/nT1F1l

Linking employees pay to output does more than affect the bottom line of a business, It affects how an employee feels about his performance. Getting a pay check at the end of the week has more meaning when you actually see what you produce. Imagine how farmers feel when their seeds actually produce fruit?

Conceptually one and one make two but if you actually put two pennys in a child’s hand, it brings it to reality. Many children are taught at a young age that if they take out the garbage they will receive an allowance, this is linking pay to performance. When I realized the value of money I was enthralled with taking out the garbage and kept asking if there was something else I could do to get paid. I couldn’t wait until I was 14 to start baby sitting. As I “earned from doing” I realized that producing had value and I was capable of producing. I bet that many of you had the same experience. It was all good!

Why don’t more retail stores adopt the policy of performance based pay? I often hear there will be more competition and the customer will suffer–why would a salesperson wait on a customer if they weren’t being paid? I would say it’s part of their job! It’s not easy devising a commission based sales structure but it has a big pay off for the store and the salesperson.
For information on how to listen to Lisbeth Calandrino’s program on Radio Indy Smallbiz next Tuesday morning from 9 to 9:30am, link here for the Guide to the Radio Indy Smallbiz Schedule.

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When to Hire your first Salesperson

Monday, May 30th, 2011

Business owners ask me, “should I wait to hire my first salesperson until I have the revenue to support them, or should I hire them to generate the revenue to support them.”

This question is similar to the age-old question, which comes first, the chicken or the egg. The answer to both questions is “both”.

When you as a business owner are at capacity for your operations, product delivery, and sales time, you must hire someone else.

The key is to pick the right time, and have a concrete plan in place that helps that salesperson “win” quickly.

Here are three factors to consider when deciding whether or not this is a good time to hire your first salesperson.

Competency – What is your most profitable skill. Are you the best in your company at product delivery, or a sales rockstar? If you are better at product delivery or operations, outsource your sales immediately. You’ll see an uptick in sales within 3 months.

Time – Are you feeling pressed for time? Take a look at your blocked calendar, and if your time is actually full of productive sales and operations activity, leverage your time by hiring out your sales. If you want to outsource sales just because you don’t like doing it and you’re being lazy, buck up and make some phone calls.

Growth – You have done the selling for years, and it’s time for explosive growth. If you want to grow quickly, develop a strong business development plan, and then hire a commission only salesperson to execute that plan.

Hiring your first salesperson can be scary. If you time it right, do it for the right reasons, and hire them with a concrete plan to attack the market; you will succeed in growing through hiring a sales team.

Jamar Cobb-Dennard
President
Rainmaker Marketing Group
jamar@jamarspeaks.com

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