Articles Tagged ‘Sales tips’

How to Become a Professional Stalker

Tuesday, June 12th, 2012

Stalking is okay – in the name of making a sale.

When you do whatever it takes to get a client to give you a meeting, I call that “sales stalking”.

Most salespeople rest their laurels in one of 3 types of prospecting methods:

– In-person cold calls
– Phone call
– Email

As a salesperson, have you ever had any prospects ignore your requests made via email or phone call?

You bet your bottom dollar you have.

Surprisingly, when 100 women professionals were surveyed, here are the top 3 methods they wanted to be communicated by:

1. Email
2. Facebook
3. Text

When was the last time you tried some “sales stalking” through Facebook or Text?

Here are a few other ideas on how to break down the door and get the meeting:

1. Show up randomly at their business. Do it especially after you’ve called them, left messages, and/or they’ve no-showed you for a meeting. They are always happy and apologetic. Typically you’ll get an instant meeting.

2. Facebook them – Most small business owners are on Facebook to do BUSINESS as well as personal socializing. The expect to be contacted about establishing relationships that can help them accomplish their goals.

3. Tweet them – See number 2, and insert the word Twitter.

4. Find someone they know (using LinkedIn or Facebook), and get an introduction

5. Get that same person they know to show up at their business with you to make an introduction

6. Show up at an association meeting or non-profit event you know they are going to be at, and introduce yourself

7. Text them

What other tactics have you used to “sales stalk” your clients?

Jamar Cobb-Dennard
jamar@jamarspeaks.com

  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Digg
  • Technorati
  • Facebook
  • del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • RSS
  • FriendFeed
advertisement

Would a “Makeover” Improve Your Customer Service?

Friday, May 11th, 2012

Quaker Oats man loses double chin

I heard that Larry, the guy on the Quaker Oats logo, just got a makeover.

The Quaker Oats PepsiCo brand is 134 years old. and Larry is looking a little tired. Since his makeover his double chin is gone and his hair is a little shorter. If you look closely, he looks like he lost about 5 pounds. Just the loss of his chin makes him appear younger. With some minor changes it changes the feeling of the brand.

They left the crow’s feet around his eyes because removing them would make him too too young!

Can you really look too young?

The Quaker Oats company was founded in 1901 so it was time for a makeover. Larry’s Quaker cousin, Aunt Jemima, traded in her bandanna for a new hairdo several years ago so she was less of a “mammie.”

She also lost 100 pounds. It’s probably time for another new hairdo.

The Jolly Green Giant has become nicer over the years, more friendly but always in good shape. But maybe his language needs to be brought up to-date and he should stop yelling “ho.”

These are subtle changes but nevertheless make a difference. They make a difference to the brand and the customers.

Of course it started me thinking: Why did Larry need to lose five pounds?

One reason is that Quaker Oats represents itself as a healthy choice cereal,one which promotes energy and the ability to lower cholesterol, and Larry doesn’t look that good. It goes together, the cereal is good and Larry looks good.

Would the customer think that Larry looks bad because he doesn’t eat Quaker Oats? Or if I eat Quaker Oats would I look like Larry? Larry represents the Quaker Oats brand and his looks need to be consistent with his brand of “good health.”

How about your brand? Who is your brand connecting to and who is your customer? How are you representing your brand? Are you and the brand looking tired and old?

What are you doing to update you and your brand?

Let’s face it; the baby boomers are working hard at staying young and living a healthy lifestyle. One of the payoffs should be looking better but it’s obvious what you eat and drink can’t change everything. So what does this mean to your business?
read full article »

  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Digg
  • Technorati
  • Facebook
  • del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • RSS
  • FriendFeed
advertisement

Are You a Hunter or a Farmer…When It Comes to Selling?

Thursday, May 10th, 2012

SerinaKelly

Some History

I can too easily answer that question for myself – I’m a farmer, but then again, I am in the business of relationship marketing and a social worker at heart, so it makes sense. First off, let’s cover a little history. Let’s go way back – when we were nomadic people, yes, years back, like 10,000 years ago – and we were definitely by far hunters – finding our dinner, killing our dinner and moving on when the dinner had been depleted. Then we started to cultivate a bit more – agriculture started to take shape, and we slowly started working the land and planting gardens. We started adapting to the farming culture.

Then the concept of hunting versus farming was put along side with the origin of ADHD with the writings of Thom Harmann. His point of view was that medicating a child that might be better at hunting (i.e – easily distracted because they notice small movements in the brush) – the whole thought of scan, scan and pounce – so they can sit quietly at school teaching the ways of “farming” doesn’t make much sense at all. The farmer, when relating it to ADHD and a child, are the ones who are extremely good at endless hours of homework and projects, but just don’t ask them to switch gears very fast, which can be troublesome in our fast-paced and ever-changing world.

In the Business World

I can tell you, the whole hunter mentality I see alive and well in many entrepreneurs I meet. Are they ADHD/ADD? Many of my entrepreneur friends may not have been diagnosed with it, but they do joke about it!

So, let’s dive into what I view as the definitions and some pros and cons of each – now remember, these are my definitions:

Hunter – someone who is engaged in new business development – finding opportunities to push their feet and entire bodies in the door and making that sale. They take quick action and are not too concerned at building a lasting relationship as they need to fill their pipeline and get sales in the door. They prowl for the next sale then move on.

Characteristics: take charge, vision, aggressive, prospector, competitive, always be closing, pitcher, entrepreneurial spirit

Pros: great for start-up companies as they need business NOW; usually A-type personalities who get things done and can be laser-focus and accomplish incredible results in a short amount of time

Cons: usually are more focused on themselves instead of others as they want the sell now or they are moving on; always trying to sell; may not listen to find out the real issues with clients; usually no follow-up (on both ideas or prospects); mentality of one and done in many cases
read full article »

  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Digg
  • Technorati
  • Facebook
  • del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • RSS
  • FriendFeed
advertisement

Getting Past the ‘No-Answer’ Gatekeeper

Wednesday, May 2nd, 2012

The only thing that you can control in sales is your activity.

You can’t control whether or not someone picks up the phone, shows up for a meeting, or says ‘yes’ to your proposal.

You can, however, increase the number of times someone responds with the desired outcome by shifting the strategy that you use to get the best result.

Case in point: prospecting through phone calls.

Many of my clients have complained lately that they are not able to increase sales because “people aren’t answering the phone”.

No problem. Stop calling them.

During a seminar with Jim Spellos (nationally known event media specialist), he did an instant text survey of 100 women about how they liked to be communicated with.

Here are the top 3 answers:

1 – Email

2 – Facebook

3 – Text

Did those answers surprise you? They certainly caught me off guard. I’ve been “dialing for dollars” for years, and now new communication technology tells me that I need to “type for dollars”.

PS – The phrasing on “type for dollars” stinks, I know. If you’ve got something better, please let me know.

If you’re having trouble getting clients to respond, change how you’re communicating with them.

What successes have you experienced communicating with clients via email, Facebook, and text?

Jamar Cobb-Dennard
jamar@jamarspeaks.com

  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Digg
  • Technorati
  • Facebook
  • del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • RSS
  • FriendFeed
advertisement