Articles Tagged ‘Sales process’

How to Sell Anything

Friday, March 9th, 2012

Selling is easy – especially when you have a system to follow.

People always ask me what my selling methodology is. Is it Miller Heiman, Sandler, Spin Selling, or Dale Carnegie?

Nope. None of them; in their entirety, at least.

I simply believe in training needs-based sales that paints a vision for clients, and highlights how a product can remove roadblocks to achieving that vision.

Kind of a hybrid of a number of sales methodologies. I guess you can call it the jamarspeaks method! Ha…

Needs-based vision selling – this is how to do it:

1. Upfront Contract – Sandler sales teaches setting an agenda or expectations at the beginning of your sales presentation. You are the leader in your sales process. Tell you clients what is going to happen over the course of your sales presentation, and what result you want to create with your meeting.

2. Tell me where you currently are? – You can’t sell someone something new (or create a problem) without knowing the current state of your client. What products or solutions are they currently using? What picture can they paint of the current state of their business or household. Get deep inside your clients present state, and you will win.

3. Tell me about where you would like to see your business? – Here is your chance to help your client get emotionally involved in your product. People buy emotionally and reinforce that decision intellectually. By having your clients creatively describe what their business or home looks like after you work with them causes them to invest in your solution without realizing it.

4. What roadblocks exist between 2&3? – The whole reason why someone would by your product is to solve the problems that keep them from achieving their vision. Dig down deep and help your client come up with tons of relevant reasons why its tough to get from point-A to point-B. This is the juice that you will sell from.

5. Let’s chat about how we can help you… – Finally! It’s time for you to present your product. You will only communicate to your client the features and benefits of your product that relate to the roadblocks the expressed in step 4. This makes your price and presentation relevant to your clients needs.

6. Close – Ask for the order. Why do all of that great work and not ask for the sale? A phrase as simple as, “would you like to jump on board?” can be the difference between winning and losing a sale.

Jamar Cobb-Dennard
jamar@jamarspeaks.com

  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Digg
  • Technorati
  • Facebook
  • del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • RSS
  • FriendFeed
advertisement

Teach what they Need, It is about them not You

Wednesday, December 21st, 2011

One of my sales mentors Tim Roberts, with Sandlers Sales Training in Indianapolis or TrustPointe used to say very simply it is not about you it is about them. Meaning focus on your prospects and clients instead of yourself and your business will grow. He inspired me to create a strategy.

The strategy is simple:

1. Immerse yourself in your target clients problems and industry
2. Use all your knowledge and leverage to create solutions for the problems your target industry faces.
3. Commit to create “breakthrough technologies, techniques, tactics or strategies for your target clients.”
4. Apply them directly to your clients’ real world business operations and then get real data, real business cases and most of all real results.
5. Offer the best practices you learned to help your target create a solution for themselves by aggregating them together and teaching them all at once.

This idea of making it about your prospect and clients has grown into a proactive action of working on their businesses for them. Why? Most of us get so caught up working in the business that we rarely have time to look back and work on it. Truth be told ten years as a business coach I have been as guilty as anybody for this business sin.

Let me ask you this? Let’s say you are sick and you need some medicine or a rehabilitation? How willing would you be to buy from the Doctor who has analyzed your charts as well as 100 other people that have your disease. He has designed a program for people at your stage of the disease and has a day by day plan of proven rehabilitation that you can follow just like 100s of your peers.

Do you really care how much it costs?

Tony Scelzo
Rainmakers Marketing Group
317-216-6345
Tony@gorainmakers.com

  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Digg
  • Technorati
  • Facebook
  • del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • RSS
  • FriendFeed
advertisement

How to Compete in Commoditized Markets

Wednesday, December 7th, 2011

If you are trying to compete in a commoditized market (flooring, web development, merchant services, insurance, et al.), you’re hosed.

The only way to get a ‘leg up’ on the competition is to tack value-added services to your product offering. Consumers will even pay a higher price for your commodity if you provide them with stratospheric value.

Here is an example: Airports. Most people don’t care about airport amenities until they’re stuck there for a 3+ hour layover, or their flight is cancelled and they have to sleep on the rock hard chairs at LGA, LAX, or DFW.

Some airports have made themselves a destination for travelers by adding fish valet (at Vancouver International Airport in British Columbia those heading home from a fishing trip with a 100-pound halibut can seek out the services of the fish valet), golf courses, chic restaurants, libraries, and breweries. As these amenities draw more travelers, airports can begin to charge higher gate fees to airlines for the increased demand. Commodity gone.

What could you offer your clients in added-value to differentiate yourself from your commoditized competitors?

Jamar Cobb-Dennard
jamar@jamarspeaks.com

  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Digg
  • Technorati
  • Facebook
  • del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • RSS
  • FriendFeed
advertisement

Everything I learned about Prospecting, I learned from my Bulldog

Monday, December 5th, 2011

We have a Bulldog that loves to skateboard. She wasn’t exactly crazy about it though when she started. Actually she was scared of the board. She wouldn’t come close to it, and she used to bark at it like she thought it was a threat to her.

The process of training an animal is all about getting small contracts of trust that lead to big contracts of trust.

First step: a treat for touching the board.

Second step: feeding her on the board.

Third step: a treat for two feet on the board.

Fourth step: a treat for pushing the board.

Fifth step: a treat for 10 feet of a pushing of the board.

Sixth step: a treat for an extended ride.

The trick is to reward along the process for small contracts of trust and gain.

How many of us try to close business in one call or expect our bulldog to skate board just by buying the board and showing up with it and a treat? The answer is just about everyone that you have met with and found yourself annoyed with because you realized someone tried to snow you with 40 minutes of calculated small talk looking to “slide in” a sales presentation “because you seem like a sharp guy”.

Our dog loves to skateboard, she looks forward to it. Because she bought it, we didn’t sell it and it was not threatening. Make sure you are giving treats along the way.

Tony Scelzo
Rainmakers Marketing Group
317-216-6345
Tony@gorainmakers.com

  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Digg
  • Technorati
  • Facebook
  • del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • RSS
  • FriendFeed
advertisement