Articles Tagged ‘Relationships’

Connecting the Team’s Dots

Thursday, October 20th, 2011

We’ve all heard the tried and true expression of “there is no ‘I’ in team.” When there are team members in an organization who do not appreciate or understand the contribution, importance and value of their work and their colleagues work, there can be disconnect with the team. When there is disconnect with a team, the entire effectiveness of the business suffers.

There is more to being a good team member than wearing a corporate logo, stamping it on a t-shirt, or putting up posters about success and teamwork. When a team works well together there is a shared understanding of and commitment to, the goals of the organization. So, how do you get the team members to work together and connect their team dots in a meaningful, productive way?

Keep communicating!

One way to encourage a shared team focus at all levels of an organization is by making sure that the goals and the vision of the company are clear and reiterated frequently. Assuming that your team knows is a big mistake.

Two: make sure that each individual knows HOW what they do fits into the goals of the organization. When polled, most employees can’t answer how what they do impacts the vision of the company. If employees don’t know their impact or how they are being measured it’s difficult to hold them accountable to results.

Three: invest in training and development. A sports team is really only as good as each individual. That’s why training and development is crucial. When organizations use effective training and development techniques, then connecting the dots in a more productive, effective way is easy.

Business owners and managers need to make sure that their team members understand the goals of the company; are clear about how they personally contribute and impact the results; and invest in training and development of their people. These three simple steps will make employees feel more respected and valued for their contributions.

Deseri Garcia
Vida Aventura
317-362-4898
www.vidaaventura.net

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Letter to Dad

Thursday, September 22nd, 2011

Today, I’m about a week from the anniversary of the last time I saw my Dad. I’m nervous… but today I read a poem by Mary Elizabeth Frye.

Do not stand at my grave and weep,

I am not there; I do not sleep.

I am a thousand winds that blow,

I am the diamond glints on snow,

I am the sun on ripened grain,

I am the gentle autumn rain.

When you awaken in the morning’s hush

I am the swift uplifting rush

Of quiet birds in circling flight.

I am the soft starlight at night.

Do not stand at my grave and cry,

I am not there; I did not die

You see, Dad didn’t really die. Maybe none of us really do. I mean is that what you truly believe? Is it what I truly believe? Or is it just something we apply to our lives when it is convenient?

Ok, enough of that. This isn’t about me. This is a letter to Dad.

This is me being genuine. This is me sharing about my Dad. This is me putting myself out there like those who place their trust in me as their business coach. I cannot ask them to share their deepest feelings, if I stay a closed book. I ask them to become vulnerable as I offer my guidance while they make business decisions, life decisions and maybe decisions that involve coping with a parent’s death.

Almost a year ago, we lost Dad. I can’t remember the exact date. Maybe that’s weird to some, but I just haven’t ever been a date person. Now, does that mean I don’t care? If you think, yes, well you obviously don’t know me. My Dad was…is the inspiration in my life.

This is my commitment to you who have disclosed your fears and uncertainties to me. This is my letter to my Dad.

I can look at myself in the mirror and see many of your faults and many of your gifts – all wrapped up in me, your son. But, you know that don’t you, Dad. I know you were worried about me. I know you thought you caused me misery when I was a kid because of who you were or what you did or could have done better.

But, it’s okay. It’s funny now; we are so appreciative of the gifts you gave us. You thought you were a hard ass, and you were right. And, you turned out some hardworking kids. Dad, just the other day, one of my business partners said to me, the best thing about being a partner with Scelzo is you know that guy is working as hard as you.
read full article »

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Eliminating “Bad Days” and the bubble that will never burst!

Friday, September 9th, 2011

ScottManning

Recently I stayed at the Gaylord Opryland Hotel in Nashville…which happens to be very similar to one big giant bubble, all-encompassing with everything you need to enjoy a full experience under one roof, or in this case, under 3 greenhouse style atriums.

Simply driving into the Gaylord you immediately feel moved to a place separate from everywhere else. And inside, you enter a refreshing natural environment in their amazing atriums that captivates you and removes you from the “outside” that you came
in from.

I just love “destination” locations, especially when they get it right.

While at the Gaylord the service was incredible, more than adequate staff, always
helpful, and taking great pride in their work. In the resort everything is
self-contained inside of the “bubble”.

You can take leisurely walks, float down their river in a little boat, take in the waterfalls and enjoy many more relaxing things. One of my favorites was watching the “dancing fountain” that put on an incredible display themed to different music and it was fun.

Of course, we ate at their top of the line restaurant, which was magnificent and an
investment valued more than the one night stay…I’m happy to report we filled every
corner of the table with different desserts, (my idea) and yes, it was just enough
for the two of us to enjoy!
(we are both still skinny – Maddy made me insert this)

The waiter was superb, and in less than 3 minutes at the table, I’d already decided
that this will be one of the locations for our Traveling National Mastermind Group
next year…and an experience it will be. Same waiter will be essential.

Anyhow, a couple quick things, every word out of every employees’ mouth was
scripted, no time to explain, or go through details, but believe me, I ask
questions, I push them, I see what they’re made of and reward them for the show.

From the hostess to the valet to the maids and maintenance, it was all planned out
and executed beautifully.

We ate breakfast the next morning at the waterfalls and just to sum it up, I ordered
(didn’t eat, but ordered) the $23 pastry basket simply to set on the table and look
at – everything was THAT good.

Another thing I’ll point out, and then I will tell you why it’s so important for you…
I asked many employees how long they had been there and what position they started
in. 4 out of 5 were more than 5 years, one just over a year, even that one, started
somewhere simple and moved up.

They have a delicate and deliberate process for grooming people and giving them room
to grow.

Finally, when I asked the waiter of 9 years (who also had a little side business of playing Jazz at some local clubs downtown), why 9 years, here…what’s the big deal about the Gaylord?

He responded immediately, stepped back from the table looked up at the ‘artificial’
stars and the real moonlight through the atrium glass, he gazed around, he looked
back and said, “what’s better than the Gaylord…you can’t have bad days inside
here!”

Now, let’s be clear, it really is comparable to Disney, to Vegas, just not as grand
a scale; it’s for different people. I love them all, same concepts apply to all
three…this just a DIFFERENT experience, different ENVIRONMENT.
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Business Lessons from Jeff Bezos and Amazon.com

Friday, July 29th, 2011

Back in May of 2008 I had the pleasure to meet Jeff Bezos, founder of online giant Amazon.com, speak at Book Expo America in Los Angeles. I was there to meet with my publisher and network. Bezos was making his first appearance in eight years to pitch the electronic book reader, Kindle, and his presentation to a packed house was compelling and highly persuasive.

In his keynote address, he mentioned the many struggles he faced in the early days of selling his idea and the massive rejection and disdain by private investors and bankers for his idea of selling books online. They thought he was nuts. In his mind he believed 100% in his vision and nothing would stop him. We’re all lucky today that he was a very persistent man. His company has turned the book publishing industry upside down, and its impressive level of sales is rivaled by few businesses in the market place.

The highlight of his keynote speech in LA was when he made a direct comment about the power of persistence and believing in your dream despite what others say or think. It was so powerful and timely that I now share it with every live group I speak to.

“Sometimes you have to be willing to be misunderstood.”

Please go back and slowly read that statement again. What an incredible idea. As soon as he said it, I stopped in my tracks and quickly realized that this was a common characteristic in high achievers. read full article »

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