Articles Tagged ‘Passion’

Selling is About Passion, Not About Sales

Wednesday, March 14th, 2012

The other day I met a personal trainer who was telling me about her profession. She was in great shape and obviously lived her profession.

“I love it she said, but they want me to sell it to people in the health club. In fact they want me to interrupt people who are working out and tell them about the personal training program.”

“So what’s wrong with that I asked?” To which she replied, “I don’t want to bother them!”

I started thinking, how can someone love what they do and not want to share it with others? Have you ever seen a movie or read a book that made you so excited you had to share it with others? Did you worry they ”wouldn’t buy it?” After you explained the movie all your friends wanted to see it. Why, because you weren’t selling the movie, you were selling passion and excitement.

I asked if she thought what she did was important, to which she again replied, “Of course I do .” She gave lip service to her passion, but somehow the possibility of connecting her passion with others didn’t exist.

Many salespeople are under the misconception that sales is about getting someone to do something or buy something because the salesperson wants them to. In this day and age, do people buy because the salesperson “makes them want to?” I don’t think so.

No wonder salespeople don’t like selling; of course they feel “pushy.” Frankly, I think they have it all wrong.

When you believe passionately about your service or your product, why not share it with the world? If your service can change a life, unleash a passion, or build self-esteem why not share it? Maybe it’s not about selling, maybe it’s about “connecting” with others. It’s not about the product; it’s about self-understanding and an ability to connect with another human.

Maybe people just don’t understand why people buy. People don’t buy because the product is irresistible, they buy because it fills a need in their soul or in their life. My friend was telling me about Oprah Winfrey attending one of Tony Robbin’s events; while she’s there she does the unthinkable, she walks the hot coals. Despite all her experience and self-understanding, she feels that walking the coals will do something for her life.

How does this happen? Something that Tony Robbins said sparked a nerve in Oprah, one that said, “there’s more to life than what you have.” (Now I’m projecting what I think was going on in her head.)
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Passion

Tuesday, January 17th, 2012

“The way you get meaning into your life is to devote yourself to loving others, devote yourself to your community around you, and devote yourself to creating something that gives you purpose and meaning.” – Mitch Albom

Recently, I served as a “Mystery Reader” at my son’s second grade class.
As I greeted the teacher, I imagined that now would be a perfect time for her to get some grading or other admin work completed while I addressed the kids.
But she didn’t.
She did a few things at her desk and then turned around and watched the kids, participating as necessary. You could see how much she loved guiding these young people.
I left thinking how lucky I was to have her teaching my son.

How passionate are you about your work?

C.J. McClanahan
Reachmore Strategies
317-576-8492
cjm@goreachmore.com

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Do What You Love – Don’t Settle

Monday, January 2nd, 2012

SerinaKelly

I read an interesting blog post last week by Chris Brogan. Now, honestly, I’m not one of Brogan’s biggest fans, and I’m sure his ego will be okay with me saying this as I know he has plenty of them – fans, not egos, but I do read his blogs now and then, and this one caught my eye – it was called “We’re No Experts.”

It so reminded me of what I see happen so much in this world of entrepreneurship – especially starting out. Too many times, we get in front of a prospect and listen to what they are wanting, and we say “we can do that.” Chris put it perfectly…

“We are quite often given the opportunity to do something we’re not qualified to do. We often take on projects we’re not qualified to take on. I do it all the time. I will sign up for something, learn that I have no idea how to do it the way I imagine it, and then I rush to learn how to accomplish something that will make my client feel I’ve delivered value.”

Now during this time, you might actually find you love what you learned and want to incorporate it into your business, but in many cases, this probably is not true. What Chris continues to say in his blog, and what I have preached for the past three years of owning my business – do what you are passionate about!

Make a vow that 2012 will be the year you focus on what you love, what you are passionate about, and I bet you will be happier, healthier and much more successful!

Serina Kelly
Relevate
www.getrelevate.com
serina@getrelevate.com
317-203-7740

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Don’t Give Up

Wednesday, September 21st, 2011

Often life doesn’t go in the direction we want it to. Does that mean our lives are doomed and we can’t achieve the success we dream of? Let’s be realistic: Everybody fails. Consider the following.

Walt Disney was fired by a newspaper editor because “he lacked the imagination and had no good ideas.” Disney went bankrupt several times before he built Disneyland. In fact, the proposed park was rejected by the city of Anaheim, California, on the grounds that it would only attract “riffraff.”

Thomas Edison’s teachers said he was “too stupid to learn anything.” He was fired from his first two jobs for being “nonproductive.” As an inventor, Edison made more than 1,000 unsuccessful attempts to invent the light bulb. When a reporter asked him how it felt to fail 1,000 times, Edison said that he didn’t fail all those times, but that the light bulb was an invention with 1,000 steps.

Albert Einstein did not speak until he was four years old and did not read until he was seven. His parents thought he was “subnormal,” and one of his teachers described him as “mentally slow, unsociable and adrift forever in foolish dreams.” He was expelled from school.

Every cartoon that Charles Schulz creator of the comic strip Peanuts, submitted to the yearbook staff at his high school was rejected.

After Fred Astaire’s first screen test, the memo from the testing director of MGM, dated 1933, read, “Can’t act. Can’t sing. Slightly bald. Can dance a little.” Astaire kept that memo over the fireplace in his Beverly Hills home.

Decca Records turned down a recording contract with The Beatles with this fascinating evaluation: “We don’t like their sound. Guitar groups are on their way out.”

Imagine if these individuals had given up, believing they were doomed to failure and would never achieve success. Do you think they ever felt down and depressed? Sure. But they didn’t allow a gloomy state to overtake them, to overpower their desire to succeed. In every case they did succeed – in a huge way, far greater than their wildest dreams.

Bad experiences can be viewed as positive in hindsight and you can make them stepping stones rather than stumbling blocks.

Dan Lacy
Growth & Profit Coach, Financial Strategist, Cash Flow Doctor, CEO Mentor
dan@dynastybuilder.com
phone: 765-644-8887

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