Articles Tagged ‘leadership’

Press Release: THE LEADERSHIP NOW WORKSHOP

Sunday, September 8th, 2013

THE LEADERSHIP NOW WORKSHOP: Sept. 13, 2013
A Special Service from Historical Solutions LLC & Dr. Dan Miller

Credibility is precious, elusive, and rare. An individual leader has to have it. An organization has to have it. And yet, valuable as it is, we know so little about getting credibility, keeping credibility, and using credibility.

What better topic for exploring credibility as a part of leadership than to probe into the current story of Syria, the United States, and the role of credibility in leadership?

How can I learn and know more about credibility and leadership? Attend the Leadership Now Workshop entitled “The Call I Can’t Ignore: Leadership and Credibility in the Story of Syria, the United States, and Civil War.”

What is this Workshop? You’ll be part of a small group that analyzes the leadership elements of this unfolding story in our lives. No politicking, no pontificating, no point-scoring from Left or Right. This is hard-core leadership learning with creativity, energy, and passion.

11am-1pm, Sept. 13, 2013. McCormick and Schmick’s. Downtown Indianapolis. $125 per person (lunch provided, follow-up provided). Registration required. Call 317-407-3687 or email dan@historicalsolutions.com to register. Very limited seating.

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Great Leaders are Consistent and Predictable

Friday, June 7th, 2013

Easily my favorite passage in recent memory came from Patrick Lencioni’s – The Advantage.

“Many leaders fail to over communicate because they get bored saying the same thing over and over again. This is understandable. Intelligent people want to be challenged with new messages and new problems to solve, and they get tired of revisiting the same topics. But that doesn’t matter. The point of leadership is not to keep the leader entertained, but to mobilize people around what is important.”

Type A leaders who innovate, create and get crap done all have the same flaw – they get bored easily. You can see it on their faces. The minute someone begins to talk about an issue that they feel has been addressed they check out. It’s rude, selfish and disrespectful.

Unfortunately, most leaders think that it’s everyone else’s fault for moving too slow and insisting on reviewing mundane day-to-day tactics. Ten years ago, I thought just like most leaders. I was convinced that I was a lot smarter than everyone else and got frustrated with topics that didn’t interest me. Ten years and hundreds of clients later, I now realize that I was very wrong.

The most successful executives I have coached are not the smartest or those that come up with the most ideas. The professionals who build the most profitable companies share one simple trait – they are committed to practicing the fundamentals.

In other words, they are boring.

These leaders have regular weekly meetings where they follow the exact same agenda. They hold annual performance reviews with every employee. They analyze the sales pipeline religiously and never fail to ask the question – “What do you need to do to close more sales?” When I reinforce this concept to my clients, they often ask, “When does this routine activity cease to be so tedious?”

It doesn’t. If you are like most professionals and crave a new challenge every 45 minutes, this type of routine behavior will always bore you.

So, how do you stay interested?

Remain focused on your goals and carefully measure your progress. As soon as you gain some momentum and realize success you’ll find it a whole lot easier to repeat the behavior that got you there.

It’s simple, but requires the discipline to delay gratification.

C.J. McClanahan
Reachmore Strategies
317-576-8492
cjm@goreachmore.com

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Leading Organizations Today: Not for the Faint of Heart!

Wednesday, August 15th, 2012

When you hear the word “transformation”, what comes to your mind? A worm, that turns into a beautiful butterfly? An ugly duckling, that turns into a beautiful swan? The common denominators in both situations are the words “turn” and “beautiful”. Another common denominator is that each goes through a process, ultimately resulting in a transformation to something different.

For over 20 years I have worked with leaders to transform the performance of their organization – starting with the leaders. I recently took the time to evaluate what the leaders of those organizations did during times of great success, and what they did when they were not so successful. What I found was interesting.

In times of great success, leaders were primarily focused on the organizational needs…

In not so successful times, leaders were primarily focused on their own needs…

Not surprising to you either? I didn’t think so.

But shouldn’t the leaders be capable of handling the ups and downs of business? Isn’t that part of being a leader?

Yes!

Then why would the leaders primarily focus on self-preservation during not so successful times?

To answer that let’s take a look at human behavior. In 1943 in his paper, “A Theory of Human Motivation”, psychologist Abraham Maslow describes the stages of growth in humans with 5 motivational levels – Physiological, Safety, Love/Belonging, Esteem, and Self-actualization. The levels formed the infamous Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, which we still refer to today. The theory is that each level of need must be satisfied before we can move to the next.

In 2010, a team of psychologists revised the hierarchy with 7 levels of human motivation to reflect how psychological processes radically change in response to evolutionarily fundamental motives. However the second level, renamed “Self-preservation”, did not change.

What does all this mean? It means that no matter what level you are in an organization, you risk falling to the second level of need – “self-preservation” – when you feel your job is not secure.

How can leaders today stay focused on helping their teams and their organizations in challenging times, even with the harsh economic realities that mean their own jobs could be at risk? A foundation of success depends on a leader understanding:

1. Servant leadership – leading teams’ means serving them. If you struggle with the word “Servant”, assess why. A leader understands the concept of Servant Leadership and that the team expects you to go first, BEFORE they follow you.

2. Self-awareness – know your strengths and where they will best fit, and be very intentional about the environment you select for employment. Realize this may mean making different decisions than you made in the past about what you do.

3. Embracing change – understand your feelings about change, and prepare yourself to embrace it, especially during organizational challenges. It is difficult to lead teams through the ups and downs of business change if you’re not good at handling it.

Leading organizations today is very different than in the past. As the economy continues to fluctuate we need leaders who are not faint of heart, and who possess the strength to primarily focus on helping their teams and their organizations.

We need leaders who understand that establishing a foundation of success will ultimately help them transform themselves, their teams, and their organizations, into something beautiful.

This article appeared in HR News Magazine.

Thresette Briggs,SPHR
Performance 3, LLC
317.403.5653
thresette@bestperformance3.com
www.bestperformance3.com

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Reinventing Yourself is Not What You Think

Wednesday, February 22nd, 2012

SerinaKelly

I read an article recently about finding your leadership strengths, you need to realize your weaknesses. The article gave several examples of well-known leaders, including General Patton, Mother Teresa, and Steve Jobs, and how they needed to compensate for what some considered weaknesses to find their true leadership strengths.

It reminded me of a leadership training I went through about two years ago called Breaking Through. Through that program, I realized my pretty darn remarkable leadership qualities, but I also realized what we called our nerds – those parts of us that hold us back from being the truly amazing people we were meant to be because we fight those “nerds” – try to stuff them instead of embracing them as part of us.

This article made such a point that hit home to me – rather than work on reinventing yourself, it’s worth thinking about whether you should embrace what you don’t like about yourself instead. The truth is that self-reinvention, when done properly, is embracing your innermost self.

Did you just have an ah-ha moment? I did!

Serina Kelly
Relevate
www.getrelevate.com
serina@getrelevate.com
317-203-7740

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