Articles Tagged ‘indianapolis’

Are You a Passive Networker?

Wednesday, July 27th, 2011

As I have been working on the book, Business Networking and Sex, I have been reading more and more studies about women in business. While women are making great strides in the business world, there are still studies being released that say women need to step up their game and be less passive. Here is a small article that I picked up from Woman’s World

Speaking out ups your on the job success!

Quick, which type of female employee do you think a boss is more likely to reward?

One who’s………

A. Nice and focuses on getting along with co-workers

B. Assertive and stands her ground when debating ideas

The answer is B! Women who are assertive at work earn 4% more than their more passive peers, reveals a recent study of more than 5,600 workers. Turns out, women who are overly nice tend to sacrifice their own career success to please others, back down to easily in conflicts and are less likely to ask for a pay raise! The takeaway: While you should not stop being polite at your job (the same study shows that angry employees earn less that everyone else!), try sharing your point of view more often and negotiating pay increases during performance reviews.

This article goes directly to the point I want to make to women who are networking, building relationship, going to events, and who want to grow their business by referral, you have to speak up! read full article »

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Small Business Strategy 1 – Henry Ford’s Start-Up

Friday, January 1st, 2010

This is one of 186 strategies and applications that will appear in Putting Your Small Business on Steroids — 186 Strategies to Increase Your ROI, by John Gifford and Matt Hall.

Henry Ford, in his formative years as an entrepreneur, used two strategies to good advantage in facilitating his automobile start-up: publicity, and attracting a key supporter who would bring more to his cause than just money. A third strategy, flexibility in means of compensation for stock, was also crucial to Ford Motor Company’s early growth.

Henry Ford didn’t really like racing his automobiles. But, in order to generate publicity and to capture the attention of rich and influential potential backers for his nascent company, he enlisted the daredevil Barney Oldfield to race the “999” at a track in fashionable Grosse Pointe, Michigan. Oldfield broke the world record for three miles and Ford gained notoriety and a wealthy backer–Alex Malcomson, a Detroit coal dealer–for the start-up of his automobile company.
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