Articles Tagged ‘Hiring’

Do You Make Bad Choices Because You’re Desperate?

Friday, July 12th, 2013

Are you desperate?

It’s fun to listen to people who have just started a brand new relationship. Everything about the person is great; they even use words like ‘soul mate.’ Five months later, the description is quite different.

I think it’s interesting how we ‘omit’ important information at the beginning of our relationships.

I have been watching one of my friends look for a mate on Plenty of Fish. At first, I felt envious; everyone she met was so caring, understanding and easy to talk to. All the relationships started the same way. Within a week, she and her latest love were inseparable and talking about moving in together. A few weeks later it was over. Whenever I ask her about how she missed the signs from the beginning, she called me a dream stealer.

Asking the tough questions isn’t all bad. First why spend time with someone who isn’t really a good fit long term? I know I love the water and could stay in it for hours. I went out with a man who was very fair, and no matter what suntan lotion he used he got terrible sunburns. He also didn’t swim that well so he certainly didn’t want to Jet Ski or para sail.

This reminds me of people who hire the wrong people for their business. They seem to like people who are like them and can only see the ‘matching’ traits. Just because the traits aren’t matching doesn’t mean it’s a bad fit. However, it’s easier to talk about it before you hire the person. If something is very important to you and your business—get it out of the way. It’s costly to hire and train a new employee—it’s even more expensive if the employee isn’t very good.

I was working with a business owner who hired, what appeared to be a capable interior designer. Unfortunately, the designer didn’t want to price the products, had trouble learning about flooring and was generally not willing to do what it took to be a good salesperson. She never thought she would have to sell the design job—she didn’t think that was her job. The employer was quite taken with the employee’s good looks and sharp credentials. Actually, I think the employer is a bit intimidated by the employee, so she might still be working.

I think whether you’re finding a mate or an employee, there are a couple of things to you might want to do.

First, have some sort of plan. Know what you’re looking for and ask questions that give you this information. If you’re looking for ‘marriage material’ it’s best to find out if the person has been married and what they liked and didn’t like about it. Asking the question about marriage during coffee will probably get you nowhere. (You have to be a bit cagier to get this answer.)

Hiring an employee can have the same pitfalls. Depending upon how desperate we have a tendency to omit certain facts and make excuses for others. (They got lost and were late for the interview. Of course, it happens to all of us. )

It’s smart to ask the employee how many times they were late on their last job. This is probably a question they never expected and might yield some interesting information.

When hiring an employee, ask the person what he/she thinks about your ‘conditions of satisfaction'; and if they have an example of when they showed those particular skills. “

You know there’s nothing worse than going to the grocery store when you’re hungry.

Lisbeth Calandrino
Fabulous Floors
Associate Publisher & Director of Consumer Research
lcalandrino@nycap.rr.com

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A Life of Spectacular Opportunities

Friday, May 31st, 2013

(Publisher’s note: Ian Clark emailed me from China, asking if I knew of any small businesses that were hiring. I thought such initiative should be rewarded, and I told him to write an article about himself and his experiences and that would be a way to get noticed on Indy Smallbiz by businesses who are hiring.)

My life has been filled with stories that, when summed up, can only be described as spectacular. Most of the opportunities that I have had are one-of-a-kind and I wouldn’t change any of them for the world.

I was born in May 1988, in Buffalo, New York, and adopted by my father, who was in the news business, and my mother, who was a Special Education teacher. At eight months of age I moved to Fort Myers, Florida, for my father’s job. Five short years later, I moved to Terre Haute, Indiana, where I would live for the next ten years. While living there many exciting things would happen to me. For 18 months, starting at age six, I received chemotherapy for a benign brain tumor which left me legally blind. I made weekly visits to the wonderful Riley Children’s Hospital, in Indianapolis. Most would consider this a tragedy, but I took it in stride, making many friends, and I became so much a part of the people in Clinic B that I even had my own mailbox. As you read further, you will notice that my blindness has not kept me from doing anything that I wanted.

During that time, my father was the News Director at WTHI-TV in Terre Haute, where I was a “fan favorite” around the news room. I was known and loved by all, in the hospital and news room. I still do this with everyone I meet, which is one of my best traits. I can make friends and acquaintances with people from the age of six to eighty-six.

Fast forward to 2004, and we move to Macomb, Illinois. My father has quit the news business, gone back to school, received two masters degrees from Indiana University, and has a job at Western Illinois University, as a Reference and Instructional Librarian/Professor.

After graduating from high school, I attended Western Illinois University for four and a half years, studying Communication and Public Relations. While there I did a seven month internship at Walt Disney World in Orlando, Florida, where I interacted with people of varying nationalities. I used the “Disney Magic” to make sure that each person left with a Disney smile. I treated them all with the respect that I would want, from everyday folks to celebrities.

My last semester of college, I decided I wanted to travel overseas for a year and teach English as a Foreign Language. I got my certification, and after graduation found a job in a “small Chinese town” of two million, Yinchuan. It is one of the fastest growing areas in China, evident by all the construction that is going on all around me as I write this.

During my senior year, another big event occurred. After having no previous contact with my birth mother, in September 2011, I discovered her on Facebook. After writing a rather mysterious letter to her, we made contact and began texting regularly. In December 2011, she and her husband attended my college graduation, making it one of the top days in my life. Later, meeting the rest of her family was an amazing opportunity. Until then, I had been an only child, and suddenly I had a little brother and little sister.

My work in China since July 2012 has involved teaching Chinese children the English language and American culture. I teach in a private school setting, and at “Number One Middle School” in my province, one of the top 50 middle schools in China. Classes may vary between two and 75 students, neither of which fazes me anymore. I have also done a lot of recruiting for my company, helping them to have the most students in the history of the school.

Me on the Great Wall of China, far right. February of 2013

My year will be completed this June and I will be returning home having learned much about foreign cultures, and how a culture determines the way business is conducted in that country.

Indianapolis has always been special to me, and upon my return in June, my goal is to find a job there. I would love to work for a small business in the area doing some sort of work with my Communication and or Public Relations major. My main concern is finding a good company that can use my talents, and the skills I have acquired through experience, in a way that matches their needs so that the company benefits from hiring me.

If any small businesses in the area are hiring, I can be reached at the following email address: irclark1988@gmail.com

Ian Clark

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Stop Hiring Losers!

Monday, December 12th, 2011

The last U.S. Census reports that small businesses with fewer than ten employees make up 78% of all employers. A recent survey of small-business owners, by SurePayroll Inc., found that poor hiring costs about $10,000 per hire. And according to a recent study by Leadership IQ, nearly half of all new hires (46%) fail within 18 months. That means every move of every employee counts.

What do you need for your business? You need super stars. Simply enough it takes good people. Don’t think there are any good people out there? Wonder why all the bad ones are in your business? Could it be your lack of nterviewing skills?Interviewing is tough business and takes being prepared. We all know that hiring mistakes can kill your company. All the motivation, all the coaching, all the training, all the total quality management and all the reengineering in the world can’t make up for a hiring mistake. If you hire bad people you can’t overcome it or train your way out.

How does it happen and how can you overcome it? Here are a few ideas. Don’t go to the supermarket when you’re hungry. Just like shopping for food on an empty stomach shopping for employees when you’re desperate produces the same results–a sick stomach and an empty wallet. Hiring a bad employee can empty your wallet as well as create problems for your business . Statistics show that a bad employee can cost upwards to $40,000 or even more. If you’re desperate to hire you’re more likely to get a bad employee.

Here are some interviewing tips to help you hire the right employees, by the way, this link is a video.

Know what you’re looking for and what will work for your business. If you’re not sure of the job description watch your employees and determine what’s right and what’s wrong with your team. What skills does your team need and what’s missing. Simply, be able to define the job.

Benchmark the job. Do you have someone who works for you with the qualities that you’re after? What does that person do well and list the qualities that you want. Maybe your industry has statistics for job performance.

Don’t hire someone like yourself. This is one of the easiest and most deadly traps that interviewers face. When someone is like you rapport is built easily and it seems like a perfect match. Ask yourself, does my business need another employee like me? If the employee is like you, how will they do with customers who aren’t like themselves?

Meet with your critical staff and develop a check list for the hiring process. If more than one person will be interviewing, everyone should be clear on the criteria. As they interview they should check off the questions and see how closely the candidate fits the criteria. Liking a person doesn’t necessarily make a good candidate.

Be forever hiring. Interview people when you’re not hungry. Encourage applications on your web site even if you don’t have an immediate need for an employee. Who knows, someone spectacular may come along, someone you don’t want to pass up.
read full article »

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When to Hire your first Salesperson

Monday, May 30th, 2011

Business owners ask me, “should I wait to hire my first salesperson until I have the revenue to support them, or should I hire them to generate the revenue to support them.”

This question is similar to the age-old question, which comes first, the chicken or the egg. The answer to both questions is “both”.

When you as a business owner are at capacity for your operations, product delivery, and sales time, you must hire someone else.

The key is to pick the right time, and have a concrete plan in place that helps that salesperson “win” quickly.

Here are three factors to consider when deciding whether or not this is a good time to hire your first salesperson.

Competency – What is your most profitable skill. Are you the best in your company at product delivery, or a sales rockstar? If you are better at product delivery or operations, outsource your sales immediately. You’ll see an uptick in sales within 3 months.

Time – Are you feeling pressed for time? Take a look at your blocked calendar, and if your time is actually full of productive sales and operations activity, leverage your time by hiring out your sales. If you want to outsource sales just because you don’t like doing it and you’re being lazy, buck up and make some phone calls.

Growth – You have done the selling for years, and it’s time for explosive growth. If you want to grow quickly, develop a strong business development plan, and then hire a commission only salesperson to execute that plan.

Hiring your first salesperson can be scary. If you time it right, do it for the right reasons, and hire them with a concrete plan to attack the market; you will succeed in growing through hiring a sales team.

Jamar Cobb-Dennard
President
Rainmaker Marketing Group
jamar@jamarspeaks.com

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