Articles Tagged ‘Follow-up’

The Power of Follow Up in Action

Friday, April 17th, 2015

I received a referral from a fan of my work in early January regarding the possibility of me speaking at her association’s annual meeting this December in New Orleans. This happens each week and I never take an introduction for granted and always do my best to follow up.

There’s a picture I show in many of my keynotes that demonstrates why follow up is of huge importance in the sales process. I can easily say that my own experience and with many clients that a lot of sales occur after the third or fourth contact with a prospect. What I’m about to share with you, helps prove this out.

Here’s a list below showing my follow up over the last two and half months with the association President whom I was referred to regarding speaking at their annual event in New Orleans and the end result:

1. Mid-January I sent the association president a follow up email
2. A week later I left a voicemail
3. A few weeks go by and I check back in with the person that sent me the referral
4. She sends a second email to the association President
5. I leave a voicemail a week later as he’s traveling
6. Speak with key contact when I call main number who handles the event, who next asks me to email her information after I explain the context of the referral
7. I email her details and am told to check back in within a couple of weeks as the President is traveling
8. I call as instructed and she mentions that she showed him my information that day
9. A few more days go by and I get an email from the association President to set up an exploratory phone call
10. We get on the phone a few days later
11. He asks for more details and a week to show his Board so they can make a decision
12. I email him the requested items after our phone call
13. Last week he emails me and says we are a go to speak this December in New Orleans!

I share this recent story for one central reason: people are busy and effective follow up does pay off. While I wish it was easier and people would get right back to me, this is often not the case. They move at their pace and in their time frame, not ours.

So, your homework: go back through your files and notes to see who you need to follow up with and pick up the phone or send off a quick email today.

Tony Rubleski
Mind Capture
616-638-3912
www.mindcapturegroup.com

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The Power of Follow up in a Digital World

Thursday, September 26th, 2013

Last week, I was on a monthly mastermind call that I’m a part of with other entrepreneurs and one of our associates from Australia mentioned his latest marketing campaign and the positive results he was getting from an elaborate, multi-step follow up sequence.

When we went round robin to give him ideas to make the promotion even better, one of our attendees asked the following question: “Are you doing a follow up phone call to leads that inquire and request more information?” Our friend from down under replied, “Yes, after 20-days we add a phone call into the follow up sequence.”

While on the surface, this may not be a big deal, in direct marketing circles this is an area that can be easily improved upon to help convert more interested leads into paying clients. So what’s the immediate lesson from my Australian mastermind business associate and the story I just shared? The answer is this: adding in a follow up call within the first few days builds authenticity and can be more effective sooner in the follow up sequence.

Here are three big tips in follow up that we can all use when people seek to do business with us for the first time.

#1. Make a follow up phone call in a timely manner. The old adage “strike when the iron is hot” is true with this tip. People are often shocked to get a phone call from a “live” human these days. In the age of digital, email has taken over. A quick, well-timed follow up call can do wonders and build goodwill with an interested prospect. In addition, the longer you wait to call a potentially interested prospect, the higher the probability they’ve already either sought out someone else or that they might have forgotten that they even raised their hand and contacted you.

#2. Set expectations. During the call, let the person know what to expect so they have a good idea of how you do business. Not only does this set the stage in an open and positive way, but it also shows that you have your act together. In addition, it immediately telegraphs good customer service which is often times difficult to find these days.

#3. Thank them for their request and reaching out to you. Yes, the lost art of appreciation. It’s amazing when we acknowledge and thank people for their time and attention, how well it is received and appreciated. In a busy world, this personal and customized follow up gets people talking and interested in you because they now see you or your company in much better light.

Bonus tip: Make sure you continue to follow up with an interested prospect over time. It’s amazing how many people stop following up with a prospect after 2-3 communications. People often take longer to make buying decisions and research has shown that it is often between the fifth and twelfth contact that many prospects, especially for high-ticket purchases, strongly consider making a buying decision.

Tony Rubleski
Mind Capture
616-638-3912
www.mindcapturegroup.com

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Digital Technology: A Big Boost to Small Business Marketing

Friday, November 19th, 2010

The digital revolution has changed communication in big ways but think small for a moment. It’s now possible to market affordably to six area high school principals or to a woman in Kokomo who runs the little league fund drive. Some call it micro-marketing. Whatever your term, it’s big, and brings enormous new power to small business marketing.

Why Important?
Let’s face it; small businesses struggle to achieve consistent, effective, affordable marketing. For some, marketing barely happens at all, forced to the back burner by today’s urgent to-do list. For others, marketing is up-down, stop-go, with strategy determined by the effectiveness of dueling single-media sales people hawking their “right answer.” In either case, it’s far too common that the real purpose of marketing is lost in the chaos.

A Clearer Understanding of Marketing’s Strategic Purpose
A room full of marketing experts wouldn’t agree on much, but they would likely agree with this: The role of marketing is to systematically convert Strangers into Loyal Customers. Advertising may attract Strangers; giving us a shot, and that’s an important component. But there’s a long road between a browsing shopper and a client who becomes a word of mouth advocate.

Now let’s step up on the soapbox. Customer loyalty is crucial to long-term success. Harvard’s Fred Reichheld has proven it by rigorous study as presented in his loyalty book series. We can see the importance in live case studies all around us. And it’s just plain common sense that loyal customers buy more, quibble less about price, are easier to serve, and give us all important referrals.

A Major Hole in Small Business Marketing
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The Secret to Growing Your Small Business in 2010: Follow-Up

Tuesday, February 16th, 2010

sarah wenger headshot
Why do salespeople, entrepreneurs, and business owners fail to make sales, fail to generate referrals, and lose clients? The reason is a lack of follow-up. Now, follow-up can fall into several categories. Let’s look at your own customers, and then we will look at prospects.

I have heard many business people say, “I just don’t understand why my customers chose to do business with someone else. I did everything right.” I then ask them, “When was the last time your customer heard from you? “ The answer is usually, “Well, umm….errrr.” The same has been said in many instances for a prospect that chose to do business with a competitor.

The relationship between a customer and a business is much like a dating relationship. There are certain things that you don’t do on the first date…and if you do, you may be risking the relationship down the road. There are also certain things that you should do if you want to cultivate the relationship. For example, a phone call now and then to say you are thinking of them, a thoughtful note from time to time, or an unexpected gift can all lead to a deeper relationship.
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