Articles Tagged ‘Focus’

Why we struggle to achieve our goals

Monday, November 19th, 2012

“Why do you struggle year after year to achieve your goals and dreams?”

Every time I speak to an audience, I ask this question and I always get the same answer – “We are lazy.” I couldn’t disagree more. The average professional in the US puts in more hours than any other time in human history.

There are two simple reasons most people struggle to reach their goals.

1. They don’t take the time to put together a set of goals.

2. They are easily distracted from these goals.

That’s it. It has nothing to do with your social media strategy, your sales staff or value proposition. The truth is that the human brain can accomplish just about anything as long as it stays focused on a meaningful goal.

Most people have convinced themselves that their success is directly related to the number of different initiatives they have going at any given point in time. The opposite is true.

Ask yourself the following question – “Do I want to be average at 15 different pursuits or the BEST at 1?”

C.J. McClanahan
Reachmore Strategies
317-576-8492
cjm@goreachmore.com

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Focus Grasshopper! 3 Tips on Maintaining Focus

Monday, July 30th, 2012

As part of my coaching business, I have weekly accountability calls with groups of clients to get an update on progress, challenges and sharing of best practices with each other. I was on a check-in call recently and several of my clients mentioned that the one thing that would make the biggest difference for them in their week would be to be focused.

Have you ever thought about how to create and maintain focus? If so, what are the techniques that you use to keep focused on the most important tasks?

Highlighted below are a few powerful techniques that I have found helpful in my own practice of focus.

1. BE Focus: Get into the feeling place of BE-ing focused. We all have activities that we do every single day that we don’t have to consciously decide to be focused, yet we are. Typically these are the things that we love to do and we do them effortlessly. An example; if you love to read the newspaper on Sunday morning, that is a focused activity that has a specific feeling resonance to it. To “BE Focus” take a few minutes to create the same feeling in your body anytime that you want to be focused on a particular task or activity. Remember practice makes perfect.

2. Set Anchor: Anchoring is a powerful way to not only be focused but to be present. In short, it is a process to create a response or a memory by using a stimulus (anchor) to activate thought. Read all about anchoring here.

To set an anchor, associate an object with a response. For example, just tell yourself, “Every time I see or touch ‘x’ I am going to do or think ‘y’.” I use my phone, door handles and drawers, my steering wheel and even web sites (you know the ones we love to get distracted by) to “wake” myself back into consciousness and get back to the task at hand. Again, it takes time and repetition, but over time the results are powerful.

3. Remind Me: Almost everyone has an alarm, a reminder app, Siri or some other device on their phone, wristwatch or computer that can be set to chime several times a day. Using bells, whistles and chimes to realign can be a great way to get back on track especially if you have a tendency to go from one distraction to another to another. A few months ago I wanted to increase my daily water intake. I simply set a reminder three times a day/night that said H2O. It worked great and now I am back on track with consistent water intake.

Here are a few additional ideas that may be better suited to you:
• Wear a rubber band on your wrist for when you are off track, snap the rubber band
• Post-it notes in your office, car and/or home
• Do Pomodoros
• Turn off distractions like email, social media alerts and your cell phone
• Time block for each specific task

If you have other ideas, I would love to hear them. Please share them with me and others in the comment box below.

Deseri Garcia
Vida Aventura
317-362-4898
www.vidaaventura.net

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Focus-One day at a time

Thursday, December 29th, 2011

“Do the difficult things while they are easy and do the great things while they are small. A journey of a thousand miles must begin with a single step.” – Lao Tzu

Most people feel stress and anxiety when they begin to borrow trouble.

If you’ve ever had an uncomfortable conversation with your boss and spent the next few days worrying about how you’ll find a job in this economy, you know what I mean.

A good rule of thumb is to focus exclusively on what you can accomplish by the time you go to bed each day.

C.J. McClanahan
Reachmore Strategies
317-576-8492
cjm@goreachmore.com

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Multi-Tasking

Monday, December 13th, 2010

Last night while leaving the gym I walked past a row of treadmills with a handful of runners.

One of these individuals caught my attention.

It was a woman who was walking on the treadmill at about the same pace that I was walking to the locker room. In addition, she was holding a phone up to her ear and having a loud conversation.

I was tempted to interrupt and let her know that a gentle walk on a treadmill while talking on the phone in no way constitutes exercise. In fact, I think you can burn more calories chewing gum.

We all feel the need to try and do 15 things at once. In fact, most people (at times including me) feel guilty when we are focusing on just 1 task at a time.

Here’s a newsflash – some activities are meant to be done by themselves, without interruptions.

Here’s a handful:

1. Talking on the phone with someone that is important to you.

2. Working on an important project – at home or at work – that requires intellectual concentration.

3. Having a conversation with someone else.

4. Sitting in a meeting.

In case you think I’m nuts ask yourself the following question – “Do you enjoy being on the phone and hearing someone typing on their computer?”

C.J. McClanahan
Reachmore Strategies
317-576-8492
cjm@reachmore.com

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