Articles Tagged ‘Facebook’

Social Media: 2013 Predictions

Wednesday, January 2nd, 2013

Every Monday morning all across America, football fans slip into the mode of the armchair quarterback. They argue loudly over the water cooler or morning coffee about the choices their favorite coach made the day before. Of course, they have an advantage. It’s Monday morning, long after the pressure of the action is over.

The coaches they are criticizing had to make those same decisions on the fly, in the heat of the game. Some of their plans are even made two and three weeks out in anticipation of what their opponents will do on the field.

In many respects, the life of the Internet marketing professional is a lot like that of a football coach. We have to make recommendations to our clients based on our best guess of what will be hot the next week, month or year. Will Facebook grow or crash and burn? Will there be a new Pinterest emerging on the scene this year? Will LinkedIn finally take their dominant role in the business-to-business arena?

I don’t have a crystal ball, but I do have opinions about what I think will be hot or not: Social media 2013

•Facebook is NOT going to throw in the towel. Businesses are not going to leave despite the many complaints. Facebook is here to stay, at least for a few more years. They have enough money to test a variety of tactics and make rapid changes in response to recent outcry.
•Facebook will launch subscription services for business. Given the lack of response and even outright disgust for their promoted posts, Facebook will find other ways to build value for small businesses. Look for offers of enhanced service bundles at a nominal fee to reengage small business users and generate revenues.
•This will not be the year of the QR code. Although I love the promise of the technology, there are not enough people who have smart phones with code readers. And let’s face it, even those of us who do have the readers rarely think to use them. Further reducing the chances the technology will catch on is the fact that companies just don’t seem to get how these tools can be used. And as a marketer, technologies such that the QR codes are still ugly.
•YouTube will become more social. Look for additional comment and sharing functionality as the integration with Google+ increases.
•Age of Social Television. It’s already happening sporadically as shows encourage viewers to live tweet during programs and cable advertisers allow consumers to download coupons or call companies with one click from their remote. 2013 will be the year these interactions move transition from novelty to mainstream.
•Google+ will grow. We may not like it any more then than we do now, but it will be harder and harder to ignore this network as Author Rank, which is tied to your G+ profile becomes an important measure of your on line credibility.
•Marketing messaging will become even more personalized. 2012 was the year of data collection as more and more tools became popular which allowed businesses to learn more and more about their clients. In 2013, consumer-centric communications will become the cornerstone of effective marketing. Businesses who are holding on to a one size fits all approach in their marketing will be left in the dust.
•Businesses are going to hold social media accountable. Tired of nebulous conversations about fans, followers and engagement, senior managers and business owners are going to look for more direct correlation to the bottom line.

As I was working on this post, I found a number of other predictions. Some I agree with, some I don’t, but they make for interesting reading. Come back in a year and we can see who was right.

Lorraine Ball
Roundpeg
Follow @lorraineball

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How Can I Use Facebook Pages for Personal Branding?

Thursday, December 13th, 2012

kylepic

Facebook pages are extremely important when creating your personal brand and telling your story. Why? They can reach millions of people in the blink of an eye! The main purpose of using Facebook is to create a community element around your brand. When you have the ability to create the community element, you will experience the beauty of viral communication. There are four great reasons for using your Facebook page to promote and develop your brand:

Facebook reaches millions—With around 1 billion users on Facebook, some of them are bound to like your brand, and a professional page makes your brand accessible to them. Unlike your personal profile, your professional page has no limits to the number of Facebook supporters that can be associated with it. The users on Facebook can essentially join your brands page without limitation.

Facebook pages allow for community-based relationships to develop—Having your brand on a page is an outlet to post all things about you…but not all things deeply personal to you. A page separates the personal from the professional. It allows you to maintain your professional presence on Facebook. You can share business updates and post videos and pictures for the people who joined your page and want to know the latest news. A page allows professional relationships to develop because people are on the page for professional purposes. A page also lets you grow your professional community in step with your personal community. It gives your audience an outlet to reach you without cluttering up your Inbox.

Advertise through Facebook ads—A professional page gives you plenty of opportunities for paid advertising. You can create ads that appear on Facebook sidebars. You are in complete control of who you want your audience to be. (Target your desired product/service demographic, and verify results with your analytics.) When you set your desired demographics, Facebook tells you how many potential users are available to click on your ad. Let’s say you want to run an ad for the Humane Society and reach single females between the ages of 40 and 55 who live within a 10-mile radius of your zip code. Facebook can tell you that 5,403 women meet the criteria and use Facebook. You can test ads you create to see what works best. The ads can promote your page or your website. By using the Like button, you can see how influential your ad is to the Facebook demographic.

Facebook ads are based on a pay-per-click and pay-per-impression model of payment. For the pay-per-click model, when a Facebook user clicks your ad, you pay a price you determined when setting up the ad at the beginning of the process. We recommend that you not use the pay-per-impression model. Return will not be as high in terms of clicks when you pay per impression. Stick with pay-per-click.

What is the best price to pay-per-click? It’s really up in the air. Facebook fluctuates best cost based on the amount of use in a given 12-hour period. To stay relevant, always look at the cost Facebook is asking you to spend. You will find the number in your Settings page. You set the budget and can change it at any time.

Note that content has shown a greater click-thru rate than paid ads within Facebook. Although Facebook ads are amazing for driving users to your pages (fan or personal), do not lose sight of organic content. You need to measure the influence of both types.

Facebook Analytics provide insight—Only a professional page gives you the ability to use the Facebook Analytics (or Insights) application. With Facebook Insights, you can gather metrics about your readers, including which wall posts get the most reactions, when users visit your page most often, and what the demographics are for your page’s friends. This helps you understand and expand your supporter base. Without a tool like this, you would have to do extensive research for the same information

kyle lacy
ExactTarget
(blog) www.kylelacy.com
(join) www.smallerindiana.com
(tweet) kyleplacy

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Pros and Cons of Facebook Acquiring Instagram

Friday, April 27th, 2012

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Now that Facebook has acquired the popular photo app-based mobile network Instagram for the price tag of $1 billion dollar, it’s time to look at how this merger will affect both services. As with any major business move like this, we can expect pros and cons and elements that will likely remain a mystery for some time. As the most important social media company of all time, one that will soon be traded publicly, Facebook has made its mark on virtually all forms of business and commerce, from custom promotional product services like Inkhead to nonprofits looking to rally their grassroots communities. Let’s take a look at the pros and cons of one of Facebook’s most important acquisitions:

Pros:

Facebook will become an even more powerful medium for photographers and artists who wish to share their work. Up until this time, Facebook has been a common medium for all people looking to promote their work and gather followers. Facebook acquiring Instagram means it will likely be heavily investing in new photo app and storage features that will likely attract many new photographers and artists and give them new opportunities to network.

Instagram will have the capital to develop tons of new features. Instagram itself will now be flush with cash and will have the financial ability to significantly develop their brand. Not only will existing features become more web-friendly, new features will likely become powerful cross-platform applications.

Cons:

They risk alienating a niche consumer base. Facebook/Instagram will soon be tampering with an extremely organic and clique-ish community that may dislike an infusion of hundreds of thousands of users. This larger user base will dramatically speed up the movement of the image feed, which could lead to unrest as more quality images get buried under a pile of others.

It’s unclear whether or how Facebook will store the old Instagram photos. Your previous ability to keep some photos private may now be jeopardized by Facebook data mining. For die-hard Instagram loyalists who liked knowing exactly where their photos were being kept, the new Facebook world could be unsettling.
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