Articles Tagged ‘exceed expectations’

Move the Needle-Exceed Expectations

Tuesday, June 26th, 2012

Last September, I received an email from one of my sales coaching clients letting me know that they were terminating my contract. I asked for a brief explanation as to why. They indicated that 3 main factors led to their decision. First, I wasn’t holding their team accountable. Second, I seemed to review the same material each week and third, I hadn’t taught them anything about social media.

I was shocked to hear the rationale behind their decision. I would never agree to hold a sales team accountable (it’s their manager’s job), I review the fundamentals each week until the team begins to put them into practice and I can barely login to my Twitter® account.

So, what happened?

The reason this client became dissatisfied with my services had nothing to do with performance. They terminated my contract because I wasn’t meeting their expectations. It doesn’t matter that I never agreed to these expectations, what matters is that at some point I stopped paying attention to what they really wanted and instead focused on what I thought was important. This type of miscommunication leads to most arguments, both personal and professional.

In theory, exceeding expectations is a simple concept – find out what someone expects and make sure you always deliver a little bit more. However, it can be very difficult to consistently execute this straightforward idea because we get so focused on ourselves.

If you are interested in growing your business, you had better become an expert in not only meeting, but also exceeding the expectations of your prospects, customers, vendors and employees. Here’s a three-step process to get you started.

First, you need to set expectations. By “set” I mean that you should help them understand exactly what you feel is a reasonable expectation from your company. This is different than simply “understanding” expectations and the distinction is important. Often, your prospects, clients and employees will set unreasonable and unattainable expectations if you let them.

Next, build a set of uncomplicated systems for exceeding these expectations. For example, if you own an accounting firm and have set the expectation that taxes will be completed by April 15th, you had better have a system in place to collect your client’s information by mid March. In addition, you’ll want these systems to be as automated as possible.

Finally, measure your results. In other words, from time to time you need to make certain that you are exceeding the expectations you set. It’s also a good idea to review these results with your prospect, client and/or employee on a regular basis. You’ll be amazed at how quickly people forget conversations and allow expectations to drift.

There you go – 3 simple steps for helping you exceed expectations. As with most things in life, the solution is simple. All you need to do is choose to execute. Choose wisely.

C.J. McClanahan
Reachmore Strategies
317-576-8492
cjm@goreachmore.com

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Praying for Rain

Monday, February 7th, 2011

ScottManning

You betcha, that’s what they were doing when I was in Orlando last month. Heck I bet they’ve got all the Indians from some Disney Movie in the back dancing and prancing around just trying to bust those clouds open.

And it worked, at least it seems to work just about every day in Orlando. Perhaps Walt knew what he was doing when he picked that spot.

So, why do you suppose they want it to rain so bad. You’d think an outdoor amusement park would fear for rain wouldn’t you.

Of course, unless, people travel from all over the world to come to your park and aren’t about to let a little water stand in their way. If that’s the case, as it is in Disney, why not just find a way to profit from it.

Try the $7.50 Disney Rain Poncho. Sold by the thousands… but who’s counting.

In every business there’s a ‘rain cloud’ that can be turned into profit, in some cases literally.

None the less, after I broke down and purchased my poncho, it sure enough stopped raining in about 5 minutes. Hey, I had a blast though. Nope, couldn’t make it over to the Magical Kingdom, but I enjoy Epcot like a kid in a candy store. Very interesting. And believe me, I studied. Talked to Cast Members, watched people, checked price points. Wow, what an experience.

Dan Kennedy, the marketing guru, swears by the fact that any serious Entrepreneur should visit Disney at least once each year, without the kids, because there’s just too much to learn. Oh, bring the kids, but on another trip.

And I’ll say, I’ve made that commitment to get back there this year.

I’ll give you 3 quick lessons from being at Disney.

#1 – They hold you hostage, keep you captive, and surround you with EVERYTHING Disney.

If you’ve been, you know what I mean. Know this, you’ve got to stay “on-site” it’s just a world of difference, you get the full effects, you see the magic happen.

Literally, you forget the outside world exists.

What are you doing to take your customers out of ‘everyday’ life and let them escape into your world. They all do want escape, you know that, don’t you?
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