Articles Tagged ‘DISC’

Using the DISC Assessment to Improve your Workforce

Friday, April 20th, 2012

A recently published study by Gallup International (the research and polling company) found that the perception of the employee’s work (happiness, contentment and motivation) is directly correlated to the company’s bottom line. James K. Harter, Ph.D., is chief scientist for Gallup’s international workplace management practice and has authored over 1,000 studies on work place issues. This particular study
examined data from more than 2,000 business units from: retail, factories and sales offices. The data consisted of satisfaction surveys, employee retention rates, customer loyalty and the financial performance of the business unit.

One outcome of the study indicated that changes made by management to improve the perception that the employee has of his job, greatly improves the performance of the business. In other words when managers boost job satisfaction of the employee, the total organization and their customers benefit. It is often reported that happy employees contribute to the success, bottom line, and happiness of companies. That’s because, I strongly believe, that happy employees are more policy compliant, reative, punctual, ethical, caring, and dedicated to the managers and companies they work for.

This is the last of a series on how to use personality assessments to better understand your employees and improve communications (i.e. employee work satisfaction). We have worked through the four pure personality types: D which is Dominant or highly driven, I which is Influential or highly sociable and great communicators, S which is Steady or very patient and thoughtful and C which is Compliant whose goal is to get it right. You now have realized that one person is typically not just one style; but a combination of normally two and you would be correct. Most people normally are high in two areas and low in two for example: DI, CS, SC, IS, IC, DC etc. Less than 2% of the population is one pure personality type: D, I, S or C.

How do you use DiSC assessments to start, maintain and keep a happy, productive, content and fulfilled workforce? Here are the three areas I found to be most helpful:

People are different

Dr. Peter Drucker often said that understanding the problem is the greatest challenge, after that the answers come easily. People are no different, if we first understand ourselves and the differences in people, working together works better. The better I understand the strengths and weaknesses of each member of my team, the more effective I become. For example, if I ask my highly detailed accounting person to get on the phone and make cold calls – it is going to be a disaster. But if I ask my outgoing, people relating assistant to make those calls, everybody is going to be happy: she will be, my customer and I will get the results I wanted. Management’s job is to maximize human capital. A small investment in a DiSC assessment will help a manager understand and get the most out of an employee.

How you communicate
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Understanding the High C Personality

Tuesday, April 3rd, 2012

The personality assessment and profiling system I use for understanding employees and building a better relationship with your management team and key employees is the DiSC. In it there are four pure personality types: D which is Dominate or high drive, I which is Influential or highly social and great communicators, S which is Steady or very patient and thoughtful and C which is Compliant whose goal is to get it right. The D and C personality type are very TASK orientated and the I and S are very RELATIONSHIP orientated.

Understanding the High C Personality

The best descriptors of a high C personality are: compliant, analytical, methodical, courteous, complete accuracy, restrained, diplomatic, mature, precise, accurate, perfectionist, conscientious, evasive, fact-finders, high standards, patient, systematic, conventional, and sensitive.

Famous people with High C personalities are: Colombo, Kevin Costner, Bill Gates, Allen Greenspan, Diane Sawyer, Henry Kissinger, Albert Einstein and Ernie Els (professional golfer from South America).

The High C personality types go by the book, follow the rules, use the right tools, have written procedures, always follow standards, make lists, plan and organize to perfection, let no small detail go unseen, provide consistent clear and objective thinking, and give the team top-notch results without thinking. These are the analytical problem solvers of the world, whose attention to detail and task-oriented approach will keep things running smoothly and accurately.

General Characteristics – High C’s are compulsively meticulous (picky). They are diligent in making sure they have no loose ends. They are always on time and intensely organized in all aspects. They keep their desks extremely clean, they think through everything from top to bottom and they are good methodical problem solvers

Communicating with a High C – They don’t like sweeping generalizations and don’t make statements without knowing they are accurate. Their strength is analyzing and they will analyze what you say and if they find that stretch the truth (or worse), they will loose all respect for you. They don’t like social talk, don’t like to be touched and want just the facts and lots of them. Make sure you provide directions that are clear and concise. They will tend to take detailed notes to ensure they know exactly what the task is. They like to be evaluated based on achievement. They don’t like fast talkers and want details on paper, documented.

Positive Characteristics of High C – They are self-reliant and are mainly focused on the task, meeting the goal is important to them. They set high standards for themselves and want to be a good example to others in the organization. They will get it done and it will be right.

Weaknesses of the High C – Their greatest strength is also their greatest weakness. Their intense need to have and analyze facts can lead to making decisions without thinking about the human factor. They can be so focused on getting it right, that they forget about the time element – getting it done on time. They can sometime make a mountain out of a molehill by over-thinking a situation, be too critical of others, get bogged down in detail, not verbalized feeling; but internalize them, select people much like themselves, and be hard on themselves.

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