Articles Tagged ‘DISC profile’

Using the DISC Assessment to Improve your Workforce

Friday, April 20th, 2012

A recently published study by Gallup International (the research and polling company) found that the perception of the employee’s work (happiness, contentment and motivation) is directly correlated to the company’s bottom line. James K. Harter, Ph.D., is chief scientist for Gallup’s international workplace management practice and has authored over 1,000 studies on work place issues. This particular study
examined data from more than 2,000 business units from: retail, factories and sales offices. The data consisted of satisfaction surveys, employee retention rates, customer loyalty and the financial performance of the business unit.

One outcome of the study indicated that changes made by management to improve the perception that the employee has of his job, greatly improves the performance of the business. In other words when managers boost job satisfaction of the employee, the total organization and their customers benefit. It is often reported that happy employees contribute to the success, bottom line, and happiness of companies. That’s because, I strongly believe, that happy employees are more policy compliant, reative, punctual, ethical, caring, and dedicated to the managers and companies they work for.

This is the last of a series on how to use personality assessments to better understand your employees and improve communications (i.e. employee work satisfaction). We have worked through the four pure personality types: D which is Dominant or highly driven, I which is Influential or highly sociable and great communicators, S which is Steady or very patient and thoughtful and C which is Compliant whose goal is to get it right. You now have realized that one person is typically not just one style; but a combination of normally two and you would be correct. Most people normally are high in two areas and low in two for example: DI, CS, SC, IS, IC, DC etc. Less than 2% of the population is one pure personality type: D, I, S or C.

How do you use DiSC assessments to start, maintain and keep a happy, productive, content and fulfilled workforce? Here are the three areas I found to be most helpful:

People are different

Dr. Peter Drucker often said that understanding the problem is the greatest challenge, after that the answers come easily. People are no different, if we first understand ourselves and the differences in people, working together works better. The better I understand the strengths and weaknesses of each member of my team, the more effective I become. For example, if I ask my highly detailed accounting person to get on the phone and make cold calls – it is going to be a disaster. But if I ask my outgoing, people relating assistant to make those calls, everybody is going to be happy: she will be, my customer and I will get the results I wanted. Management’s job is to maximize human capital. A small investment in a DiSC assessment will help a manager understand and get the most out of an employee.

How you communicate
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Understanding the High C Personality

Tuesday, April 3rd, 2012

The personality assessment and profiling system I use for understanding employees and building a better relationship with your management team and key employees is the DiSC. In it there are four pure personality types: D which is Dominate or high drive, I which is Influential or highly social and great communicators, S which is Steady or very patient and thoughtful and C which is Compliant whose goal is to get it right. The D and C personality type are very TASK orientated and the I and S are very RELATIONSHIP orientated.

Understanding the High C Personality

The best descriptors of a high C personality are: compliant, analytical, methodical, courteous, complete accuracy, restrained, diplomatic, mature, precise, accurate, perfectionist, conscientious, evasive, fact-finders, high standards, patient, systematic, conventional, and sensitive.

Famous people with High C personalities are: Colombo, Kevin Costner, Bill Gates, Allen Greenspan, Diane Sawyer, Henry Kissinger, Albert Einstein and Ernie Els (professional golfer from South America).

The High C personality types go by the book, follow the rules, use the right tools, have written procedures, always follow standards, make lists, plan and organize to perfection, let no small detail go unseen, provide consistent clear and objective thinking, and give the team top-notch results without thinking. These are the analytical problem solvers of the world, whose attention to detail and task-oriented approach will keep things running smoothly and accurately.

General Characteristics – High C’s are compulsively meticulous (picky). They are diligent in making sure they have no loose ends. They are always on time and intensely organized in all aspects. They keep their desks extremely clean, they think through everything from top to bottom and they are good methodical problem solvers

Communicating with a High C – They don’t like sweeping generalizations and don’t make statements without knowing they are accurate. Their strength is analyzing and they will analyze what you say and if they find that stretch the truth (or worse), they will loose all respect for you. They don’t like social talk, don’t like to be touched and want just the facts and lots of them. Make sure you provide directions that are clear and concise. They will tend to take detailed notes to ensure they know exactly what the task is. They like to be evaluated based on achievement. They don’t like fast talkers and want details on paper, documented.

Positive Characteristics of High C – They are self-reliant and are mainly focused on the task, meeting the goal is important to them. They set high standards for themselves and want to be a good example to others in the organization. They will get it done and it will be right.

Weaknesses of the High C – Their greatest strength is also their greatest weakness. Their intense need to have and analyze facts can lead to making decisions without thinking about the human factor. They can be so focused on getting it right, that they forget about the time element – getting it done on time. They can sometime make a mountain out of a molehill by over-thinking a situation, be too critical of others, get bogged down in detail, not verbalized feeling; but internalize them, select people much like themselves, and be hard on themselves.

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Understanding the High S Personality

Friday, March 16th, 2012

The personality assessment and profiling system I use for understanding employees and building a better relationship with your management team and key employees is the DiSC. In it there are four pure personality types: D which is Dominate or high drive, I which is Influential or highly social and great communicators, S which is Steady or very patient and thoughtful and C which is Compliant whose goal is to get it right. The D and C personality type are very TASK orientated and the I and S are very RELATIONSHIP orientated.

Understanding the High S Personality

The best descriptors of a High S personality are: passive, amiable, steady, predictable, understanding, mild, inactive, friendly, systematic, good listeners, sincere, team players, patient and stable.

Famous people with High S personalities are: Laura Bush, Mr. Rogers, Gandhi, Walter Payton, John Denver, Hugh Downs, Mother Teresa, Tom Brokaw, Rodney Rogers (professional basketball) and Barbara Bush.

General Characteristics – High S’s are non-emotional, emotional people. Whether they are going through a terrible personal ordeal or have just won the lottery, you may not know. High S’s do not express their emotions. If you play a game with them that involves bluffing, you will learn quickly the strength of the High S. They are calm and relaxed and have a deep concern for others and are always willing to help. Once in an established “groove”, they can follow it with unending patience. They have the ability to do routine work, at all skill levels, and develop good work habits.

Communicating with a High S – Remember that they are more people than task orientated. So start with a personal comment to break the ice before rushing into business matters. You should be patient, listen carefully and be responsive rather than trying to force a quick response. If you need a decision from a High S, give them time to think and provide them information rather than trying to force a quick decision. They do not respond to an aggressive approach or to fast paced changes. They are not argumentative people and they work best in a stable and predictable environment.

Positive Characteristics of High S – They are full of common sense and are highly trust worthy – you can give them the company checkbook and they will handle it as if it was their own. They are strong team players and have a high level of patience and persistence. They will usually listen and process your information before talking. They radiate dependability and have a calming and stabilizing influence on those around them. They would rather work behind the scene to insure success. They are also good at reconciling factions, calming and stabilizing an organization. They bring incredible strength to a team.

Weaknesses – They tend to write long, informational memos and letters. They operate at a relaxed pace, make decisions at a more deliberative pace, follow rules and dislike change or conflict. Personal assurances and guarantees also mean a great deal to them; but never promise something you can’t deliver. High S’s take things very personally. They may also need help in getting started on new assignment and have difficulty in establishing priorities. They hold grudges, and are typically oversensitive to criticism. Their greatest fear is loss of security. They are motivated by safety, security, and recognition for their loyalty.

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Understanding the High I Personality

Tuesday, February 28th, 2012

The personality assessment and profiling system I use for understanding employees and building a better relationship with your management team and key employees is the DiSC. In it there are four pure personality types: D which is Dominate or high drive, I which is Influential or highly social and great communicators, S which is Steady or very patient and thoughtful and C which is Compliant whose goal is to get it right. The D and C personality type are very TASK orientated and the I and S are very RELATIONSHIP orientated.

Understanding the High I Personality

The best descriptors of a High I personality are: enthusiasm, trusting, charming, popular, influential, confident, persuasive, convincing, inspiring, spontaneous, sociable, talkative, emotional, generous, optimistic, self-promoting and a good mixer.

Famous people with High I personalities are: Robin Williams, Bill Clinton, Jay Leno, Tony Danza, Oprah Winfrey, Steve Martin, Arnold Palmer and Dolly Parton.

The High I personality types are creative, creative problem solvers, and great encouragers. They motivate others to achieve through a positive sense of well being and many times with humor. They are good at negotiating conflicts and are peace makers. Throughout the campaign of 1992, reporters continually commented on the way then Governor Clinton energized and connected with people. President Clinton is clearly an extrovert, unafraid to show his emotion or express his concern. Even his foes state that he clearly cares about people, even if they disagree with his agenda.

General Characteristics – High I’s are very talkative. They are very relational and people orientated and like to talk about how their weekend was. They are the most optimistic of the four personality types and are fun to be around. They are good friends and very supportive of their other team members and are positive when dealing with goals for future success.

Communicating with the High I – They are motivated by popularity and acceptance. A verbal acknowledgement of a job well done in front of their peers will go a long way with them. Give them opportunities to verbalize their ideas, realizing that they will need assistance in turning their ideas into action. They work well in a friendly environment and freedom from rules and regulations. They don’t like structure and are motivated by new experiences, challenges and relationships.

Positive Characteristics of the High I personalities are instinctive communicators. They are, for the most part, very enthusiastic team players who do well in job positions that allow them to interact with others. They respond well to the unexpected, and willingly offer their opinion whenever asked for it. They thrive in group activities and a professional and social work environment.

Weaknesses – Many High I personalities avoid getting and staying organized. Follow through, detail and paper work is a constant struggle for them. Since they are always very positive and their goals are usually much higher than is reasonable to attain (monthly sales goals for example). Some may allow their friendships to dominate their time.

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