Articles Tagged ‘Branding’

How Can I Use Facebook Pages for Personal Branding?

Thursday, December 13th, 2012

kylepic

Facebook pages are extremely important when creating your personal brand and telling your story. Why? They can reach millions of people in the blink of an eye! The main purpose of using Facebook is to create a community element around your brand. When you have the ability to create the community element, you will experience the beauty of viral communication. There are four great reasons for using your Facebook page to promote and develop your brand:

Facebook reaches millions—With around 1 billion users on Facebook, some of them are bound to like your brand, and a professional page makes your brand accessible to them. Unlike your personal profile, your professional page has no limits to the number of Facebook supporters that can be associated with it. The users on Facebook can essentially join your brands page without limitation.

Facebook pages allow for community-based relationships to develop—Having your brand on a page is an outlet to post all things about you…but not all things deeply personal to you. A page separates the personal from the professional. It allows you to maintain your professional presence on Facebook. You can share business updates and post videos and pictures for the people who joined your page and want to know the latest news. A page allows professional relationships to develop because people are on the page for professional purposes. A page also lets you grow your professional community in step with your personal community. It gives your audience an outlet to reach you without cluttering up your Inbox.

Advertise through Facebook ads—A professional page gives you plenty of opportunities for paid advertising. You can create ads that appear on Facebook sidebars. You are in complete control of who you want your audience to be. (Target your desired product/service demographic, and verify results with your analytics.) When you set your desired demographics, Facebook tells you how many potential users are available to click on your ad. Let’s say you want to run an ad for the Humane Society and reach single females between the ages of 40 and 55 who live within a 10-mile radius of your zip code. Facebook can tell you that 5,403 women meet the criteria and use Facebook. You can test ads you create to see what works best. The ads can promote your page or your website. By using the Like button, you can see how influential your ad is to the Facebook demographic.

Facebook ads are based on a pay-per-click and pay-per-impression model of payment. For the pay-per-click model, when a Facebook user clicks your ad, you pay a price you determined when setting up the ad at the beginning of the process. We recommend that you not use the pay-per-impression model. Return will not be as high in terms of clicks when you pay per impression. Stick with pay-per-click.

What is the best price to pay-per-click? It’s really up in the air. Facebook fluctuates best cost based on the amount of use in a given 12-hour period. To stay relevant, always look at the cost Facebook is asking you to spend. You will find the number in your Settings page. You set the budget and can change it at any time.

Note that content has shown a greater click-thru rate than paid ads within Facebook. Although Facebook ads are amazing for driving users to your pages (fan or personal), do not lose sight of organic content. You need to measure the influence of both types.

Facebook Analytics provide insight—Only a professional page gives you the ability to use the Facebook Analytics (or Insights) application. With Facebook Insights, you can gather metrics about your readers, including which wall posts get the most reactions, when users visit your page most often, and what the demographics are for your page’s friends. This helps you understand and expand your supporter base. Without a tool like this, you would have to do extensive research for the same information

kyle lacy
ExactTarget
(blog) www.kylelacy.com
(join) www.smallerindiana.com
(tweet) kyleplacy

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You, The Architect of Your Customers’ Experience

Friday, November 2nd, 2012

ScottManning

So…recently I spent the day at the Biltmore Estate in Asheville, North Carolina. It was fabulous and such an “experience”. It’s a must see for history as it’s thenation’s largest home it is also a brilliant example of marketing a destination and providing your customers as many ways to give you money as possible.

First and foremost you should make the Vanderbilts a study of old school entrepreneurship and building and sustaining a fortune. This specific historic landmark is still privately owned and run by the family as a for-profit business. As they should.

They have a quote that says, “We don’t preserve the Biltmore to make a profit, we
make a profit to preserve the Biltmore.” That’s a great philosophy for you to
understand wealth; it is your responsibility to maximizing your profits for yourself
and for your customers. You can’t provide the service and run your business most
effectively unless you are making a profit. Duh. The more the better.

I thought I’d share some of my experience with you and let your mind imagine and
wander around your business and brainstorm how you could be making your customers’
interaction with you more of an experience. When you do this, whether selling
online, locally, from home or brick and mortar, you will captivate your customers’
minds and their money.

Here are a few lessons…and how you can apply them to your business.

Controlling Traffic. This idea is most notable for Disney where people exit rides and
are then guided / forced to walk through the gift shops. At the Biltmore traffic
flow is guided, one way in and one way out, past the house and other attractions,
you can’t help but drive by and want to stop. In your business you should be
“guiding” your customer’s path whether online while shopping and buying or in person
or at an event, etc. Control the customer path.

Provided Everything. If you don’t want your customer to wander away from you, look
at what else they will want or need to buy. At the Biltmore at some point it was
nothing more than a tourist attraction to come and see history, not shops, food,
activities, everywhere — truly you can spend days, certainly a day and never leave
because one thing leads to another. Does your customer have a series of things they
can do and buy from you, are you providing everything they need to make their
purchase and experience complete with you?

Branding and congruency. Most people think of this for bigger companies but it’s
the little details that matter. Every place and everything you buy at the Biltmore
is private labeled. Sure they sell other goods in their shops but whenever possible
things say “Biltmore” on them. Of course the reason is you can only get it there…so
when you are buying on impulse there is not conversation of “we’ll get this another
time.” Does your customer see your brand enough places — are you building loyalty by
being congruent and in their minds from start to finish…do you have “take home”
value?

Upsells and Upgrades. My favorite part of the Biltmore which they could do a much
better job of as we all could, but they do very well, especially considering their
unique business model is this: At every (and I mean every) cash register they ask if you
are an “annual card holder” or member because you get 10% off. They work very
diligently to upgrade your membership to receive discounts and to get you back.
They also have 2nd day passes for only a small additional fee. Of course once you
are there you want to come back. Do you have loyalty programs and appropriate
incentives, reasons and plenty of ways for your customers to give you more money?

The Experience and getting your customers back. Overall the experience was amazing
and I can’t wait to go back. They have special times for every season changing
decorations, activities, and of course the natural environment changes already.
They also did an amazing job encouraging this place to be a routine visit and even
for locals it was obvious all throughout the day that local people embraced the
Biltmore and treated it as a Park where they would go perhaps daily for exercise and
enjoying nature. It was a family friendly, warm and comfortable place that just
made you want to go exploring and stay as long as you possibly could. A funny thing
about experience, each place had hours staggered so you could coordinate your
visits, the house taking final tours at 4:30, shops closing at 6:00, other shops
closing at 8:00, and restaurants closing at 11:00. I mean it was simply brilliant.

So, you just have to go…you must see this place, please be sure to plan for a full
day or spend two days in Asheville because it’s amazing too. We didn’t get to stay
at the Inn at Biltmore but plan to when we return.

Please take time to look at your business and see if it excites people, see if you
would want to be your own customer, if you’d want to come back…see if you have an
experience in place that keeps your customer engaged and wanting to stay and spend
money with you. This is the secret of all secrets: once you get them, you have to
keep them…and you want your customer so excited about you they write things like
this, what I’m doing right now…that’s when the magic happens. An experience so
grand that your customer leaves talking and telling and sharing all about you, and
they can’t wait to go back and give you more money themselves.

You’re the master designer and architect of your customers’ experience…have fun
and they will too.

Scott Manning
www.nobsindy.com

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How To Use Social Media to Invent or Reinvent Yourself

Wednesday, July 18th, 2012

kylepic

Self-promotion is not bragging or boasting. It’s not being something bigger than you are. It’s just letting people know who you are and what you do.

It’s perfectly acceptable to promote yourself without looking like an arrogant jerk. People are going to be out promoting themselves and their personal endeavors and small businesses. If you’re not, you’re missing out on good opportunities, and others are going to beat you in the competition. They’re going to sell their art, get their speaking gigs, get more web traffic, or whatever they’re competing with you for.

What Can Self-Promotion Do for You and Your Career?

Without question, self-promotion can make you successful. And if you’re already successful, it will make your personal brand huge. You don’t get to be a success without knowing a lot of people and having a lot of people know you. If you want to be stuck in a little gray cubicle for your entire career, never rising above lower middle management, keep your head down and don’t attract attention. Actually, put this book down. Stop reading! But if you want to make a name for yourself, establish a good reputation, finally get that corner office, or even own your own successful business, you need to promote yourself.

To do that, you need to be passionate about two things: the work you do, and yourself. If you’re not passionate about what you’re doing, find the thing you’re passionate about. If you’re not passionate about yourself, seek professional help. The person you should love the most, admire the most, and treasure the most is you. And when you have that confidence in yourself, others will see it, too. When you share that confidence with other people, they’ll feel confident about you as well.

So don’t sit in your cubicle any longer. Figure out what you want to do, make it happen, and then start telling people about it. Let them know that you are good at what you do. Let them come to you for answers and information.

This is an excerpt from my book – “Branding Yourself.”

kyle lacy
ExactTarget
(blog) www.kylelacy.com
(join) www.smallerindiana.com
(tweet) kyleplacy

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6 of the Top Mobile Trends to Watch

Wednesday, June 29th, 2011

kylepic

It’s official. Mobile apps are taking over the world. We no longer live in a world where the internet is the go-to pastime. Now, it’s all about those apps and having social networks at your fingertips whenever and wherever you may be. In a report released by Mary Meeker, partner at Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, these statistics were categorized into the top 10 influential trends happening in today’s rapidly changing technological world.

1. Tablets taking over

The iPad has far surpassed the iPhone and iPod in popularity. The iPhone only shipped a little under 4,000 units it’s third quarter after launching, compared to the iPad which released over 14,000 by its third quarter. While both the iPhone and iPad have revolutionized the use of apps, the iPad is clearly leading the way in mobile internet use now. About 150,000 desktop computers are estimated to sell by the end of 2011, under 400,000 laptops, and over 400,000 smartphones. These are some big numbers, but tablets are estimated to sell close to 500,000, leaving computers in the dust.

2. Mobile is Global

Only five countries make up 46% of the entire world’s internet use. China is the leading force with 384 million people, compared to the US with 240 million users. The other countries are Brazil, India, and Russia.

3. Social Networking to Blame

Facebook is (not surprisingly) the leading social network with 662 million users and 550,000 apps. Google is the leading search engine with 972 million users. Apple takes the cake for leading mobile sales with 130 million users and 350,000 apps (but can you believe…over 10 billion downloads). Twitter was the most popular tool for information sharing with 253 million users.

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