Articles Tagged ‘Brand’

5 Tips to Writing Great Marketing Stories Around Your Brand

Monday, June 13th, 2011

kylepic

When telling a story how do you make it worthwhile to read? Remember… there are very few of us who have 10 to 15 minutes of free time to read cool new stories and articles. How do you captivate your audience? How do you encourage them to turn the page?

The same thought process should apply to every form of marketing leaving the door of your company or organization. How do you tell your story? How does it encourage people to act?

One thing to keep in mind when writing your story is the focus. As storytellers we can easily go off on tangents and get distracted. Stay on track by sticking to the main point of the story. If your having trouble finding your focus then stop and think….
and think some more…

It’s easy to forget a fundamental key in storytelling…thinking.After some reflection and thought… the focus may come. And remember that the focus is what the story is about…why it was told… and how it will encourage your user to act.

Remember the following five tips to better understand marketing and how to tell your story:

1. Remember why your story matters. Why does my story matter? Why are you telling your story? You think it matters but who else does? This goes hand and hand with understanding your audience and telling them a story they’d connect with… emotionally.
2. Do you have a point to your story? What’s the purpose of the story. To teach something? To share an experience that changed you? This is your focus. You should be able to define what that is with only a few words.
3. Why do you tell your story? Original content comes from people who are simply willing to tell their story not attention seekers. So what’s your motivation behind the story?
4. How do you relate to the story? What does this story say about me? Does it reflect you in a good light? Does it tell you audience who you are? Does the story flow? Is there a clear understanding? You want to make your story understandable and relatable. You want to be liked but you want to leave them with something to chew on.
5. What daily activities could I use to better tell my story? Reflect on your daily activities to look for life experiences to help reach and engage with your audience. How do your use your life experiences to shape your story?

Why is it important to focus on the five steps? Because we want to know what the story was about.

We want to know why the story was shared.

We want to take something away from it… connect with it.

kyle lacy, ceo
brandswag corp
(blog) www.kylelacy.com
(web) www.getbrandswag.com
(join) www.smallerindiana.com
(tweet) kyleplacy

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40 Ways to Build Trust in Your Brand on Social Media

Tuesday, March 1st, 2011

kylepic

In the new economy there is one major truth that stands above the rest. Trust equals revenue. If you are a small to mid-sized business or organization it is the amount of trust you can build between people that strengthens your brand. Whether we are talking about donors or customers,  it is about building trust that filters into an integrated marketing system with digital and traditional tools. THAT is where the true success is found within the marketing world.

With trust comes happy people and with happy people come referrals or what we call advocacy at MindFrame. Trust is a fundamental block of building your brand. Marketing is built under the assumption that stories can create an emotional bond between a consumer and a brand… a client and a service. Can you tell a story… create a service and/or an experience that builds trust?

Digital marketing can help you build that trust.

1. Content

Content is the number one way you can build trust with potential clients. By creating meaningful and thought provoking content you are building a bridge to later sell that person on your services.

2. Tell A Story

The stories surrounding your company or organization are the only thing that creates differences between the competition. It is extremely important that you allow for your consumers to tell the story for you. The people who love what you do… and the people you serve… are the best to tell the story of your company. Forget about mission statement and vision statements… ASK your consumers.

The nonprofit industry should be the best at telling their story… they live it on a daily basis! Tell the story. Feed the aspirational ideals of the people involved in your brand… then you will see results.

3. Transparency

This can also pertain to content or how you use a specific social network. Be human. The people who are interested in your thoughts and suggestions want to know about you as a person. They could care less about a sale you are having or the amount of money you can cut off their bottom line…. to an extent. They want to know how you helped LARRY the plumber or Susan the account.

They want to know how you changed the lives of an individual just like them. Again, tell the story.

4. Picture of Your Day

When you are using social networks make sure you put up pictures of your daily life. If you have a cell phone with a camera take some pictures of your daily routine and share them with your connections. Just don’t over do it. We can only look at so many professional business or glamor shots in a day.

This also feeds into the aspirational aspect of the nonprofit industry.

5. Picture of You

Use your real picture. I don’t know how many times I have said this. Don’t use your logo. There is only one exception to this rule. If you are usingTwitter for your business and personal (see my company MindFrame for an example). Also, do not use a glamor shot from the 1908s. We ALL know you are lying… the only person you are trying to fool… is yourself.

6. Saying Thank You

If somebody helps you share information or decideds to retweet a post.. make sure you thank that person. They are helping you spread the word… they are your online evangelists.. If you miss a thank you.. don’t let it kill you.. but try to make the most of the people that help you out.

This is (of course) possible for a small organization. However, for the larger organizations… make sure you thank the people who are truly involved in the process.

7. Do Not Auto-DM on Twitter

See my post… I hate Twitter Auto-DM

8. No Hard Selling… Ever

I don’t care about your e-newsletter, the new lotion you are selling, or year-end campaign. Also, just because I reply to a tweet or a message does not mean you can message me back and sell your wares. Social media is a long sell process. You are developing content in order to gain an order of trust with people in your area of influence. We are now experiencing a relationship driven economy… get on the train.

9. Time is Important

Remember that you are building relationships.. do not trust the people that tell you to add 1023920 friends and make $10,000 a month. It is a load of crap. Build your following slowly… create relationships in an online environment that can be transferred offline.

And remember to integrate as much as possible. Try to pull your Twitter and Facebook followers to your email newsletter or direct mail campaign.

10. Criticism is Important

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Perception vs. Reality

Thursday, January 27th, 2011

I recently completed a book called Sway by Ori and Rom Brafman.

It reinforces the concept that perception is almost always far more important than reality.

We often tell ourselves that we shouldn’t “judge a book by its cover” but unfortunately most people do. And with the onslaught of information coming at us each day, this is the new reality.

As a result, it is absolutely critical that you consider the impression you leave on others at all times.

If you’re not sure where to start ask yourself the following questions?

1. What does my physical appearance say about me?
2. What does my facial expression say about me?
3. What does my voice mail greeting say about me?
4. What does my car say about me?
5. What does my tone of voice say about me?
6. What does my email signature say about me?
7. What does my website (think initial impression) say about me?
8. What does my contract say about me?

Now more than ever we need to realize that it’s extremely difficult to overcome a first impression.

By the way… If you find yourself thinking, “I don’t want to do business with people that are going to allow my appearance, car, tone of voice, etc. affect their opinion of me?” get ready to cut your pool of prospects by 90%.

C.J. McClanahan
Reachmore Strategies
317-576-8492
cjm@goreachmore.com

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Why you must build authenticity into your marketing

Thursday, December 16th, 2010

The game’s almost up. There are few places left to hide. In the age of instant search, you and your organization’s reputation are now only a keystroke away for the world to discover. Transparency online is becoming the new normal. This is one of the positive consequences of the digital age. In a strange paradox, there’s a new scam being made online each day while at the same time there’s another one being found out and put out of business. Managing and building a solid online reputation is the newest tool and skill to add to your marketing quiver.

Here’s a quick observation as to how most of us view the daily messages we encounter: we all have a built in BS meter when it comes to marketing messages of any kind. Let’s take a closer look at what I call “persuasion nets” in our minds that often build up over time with cynicism and doubt when we’re confronted with most marketing messages. Here are a few key persuasion nets that shape our BS meter in relation to dealing with marketing messages:
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