Articles Tagged ‘Book review’

Grow Your Business from Unfunded to Freedom

Monday, April 25th, 2011

Let’s face the fact that most first-books by local authors suck hyssop. They’re too wordy, have a ton of editing mistakes, aren’t contiguous, are cheaply produced, and don’t help the reader do anything besides stroke the authors ego.

This is not the case with Nick Carter’s, Unfunded.

I applaud you for reading the books and attending the local book launches of your friends and colleagues. It’s good to support them. Writing a book is hard work – even when it’s done poorly. These activities are helpful to people who aren’t good writers. Support Unfunded for a different reason.

I beseech you (what’s up with all of the biblical words today?) to read Unfunded and attend the book launch, because you want to learn how to grow your business from the ground up with no funding. If you’re looking for a quality book that delivers that result, Unfunded is the answer.

Let’s talk about content.

If you’re a business newbie, the undefined jargon in the first 36 pages of the book will throw you for a loop, but once Carter begins breaking down the structure behind an unfunded business, something magical happens. In a quick 150 pages, Unfunded transforms the lame “hobby” business that your wife and friends tease you about, into a viable method of starting a business.

Carter doesn’t only break-down growing from unfunded to blue chip into an easy to follow system; you also get to peek into his personal world. When I first met Carter, I was a young entrepreneur who didn’t have money to fix his brakes. Carter, the farm boy, showed up in a hospitable way and offered to turn my rotors and change my brake pads in his pole barn. It’s personal stories like this, and the theme that starting an unfunded business is like starting a fire without accelerant, that poise Unfunded to someday climb national best seller lists.

When I was at the music conservatory as a teenager, our professors taught us that our real value as musicians was the quality of our ‘original’ thoughts. The same thing goes for authors. When reading Unfunded, you will run into a few of Carter’s original ideas, which position him as a creative leader in business thought.

Here is my recommendation. Get Unfunded, and carry it with you daily. If you want to be successful as an unfunded entrepreneur, I should see this book on your dashboard, in your briefcase, and on your night stand.

Jamar Cobb-Dennard
President
Rainmaker Marketing Group
jamar@jamarspeaks.com

Jamar Cobb-Dennard is a business development strategy and implementation expert, and the President of Rainmakers Marketing Group. For 6 Business Development Must Do’s You’ve Probably Missed, please visit www.jamarspeaks.com.

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Why You Must Poke the Box

Thursday, April 7th, 2011

When I heard Seth Godin had released a new book, I immediately clicked over to Amazon and ordered a copy with anticipation and glee. After reading and reviewing Seth’s last book, “Linchpin: Are You Indispensible?” I was eager to get my hands on his latest thought provoking work.

So how do you follow up such a groundbreaking book like Linchpin? Only Godin could attempt and I’m glad to report; pull it off once again!

In his new book, “Poke the Box,” Godin opens up with the following quote: The job isn’t to catch up to the status quo; the job is to invent the status quo. This should give you some indication of the mental fireworks he intends to set off in the mind of the reader.

The premise of Seth’s book is that starting and taking risks is the key point of leverage for those employed or self employed in today’s age of instant Internet connectivity and global competition. His blast of strong opinions and take charge attitude jumps off the pages not to scare, but to excite people to take their inner genius and allow it to awaken and inspire not just themselves, but the world they seek to positively influence.

I’ll warn you up front: many people will fear and dislike this book. Why? He states what all of us know deep down inside about creativity but often allow others or our own selves to suppress and keep hidden. This is a book about taking action, solving problems and rebelling against the status quo which is being quickly dismantled in an age of open communication and rapid idea acceleration.

We need people like Godin willing to tell it like it is. I’m convinced that many of society’s key leaders would rather he stay quiet and avoid poking the box. However, this book gives you permission to question the status quo and go on the offense. Keep the hammer down Seth!

Here’s an instructive lesson on page 5: “The simple thing that separates successful individuals from those who languish is the very thing that separates exciting and growing organizations from those that stagnate and die. The winners have turned initiative into a passion and a practice.”

In conclusion this short, 84-page manifesto about starting is loaded with huge ideas to provoke, inspire and push you to not only poke the box, but share with you successful examples of others who’ve already done it and those who are currently carrying out its powerful message!

Tony Rubleski
Mind Capture
1-800-420-1450
www.mindcapturegroup.com

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Book Review: “Thrive” by C.J. McClanahan

Wednesday, March 2nd, 2011

Review by John Gifford

On the front cover of C.J. McClanahan’s book, “Thrive,” is the statement: “Seize your extraordinary life with five simple strategies.”

The aim of “Thrive” is something that few, if any, self-help books accomplish: enable the reader to implement the self-help changes that the book proposes. And in fact, McClanahan’s book is also different in that it doesn’t suggest particular goals. Those are left up to you.

What he does give you is a schema that enables you to design a destination set of goals for the “Extraordinary Life,” a simple group of strategies to enlist in reaching these goals, and a four-step process that helps to embed your actions towards these goals into habits that strengthen over time and become second-nature. The power is in the details.

In the grid below, along the top are shown the six life categories under which you generate your Extraordinary Life goals through answering the questions that he poses to guide you.

To the left of the grid are the five strategies you are to pick from to help you reach the specific goal you are working on. Below the grid are the four steps in the process you should use with each strategy to ensure that the behavior change sticks and becomes a valuable habit in your behavioral repertoire.
 

      
      
      
      
      

 
The four-step process that you use with each strategy you employ includes:
1. Create visual reminders
2. Map out your day
3. Find some accountability
4. Reflect

Here’s how the slow, step-by-step process (C.J. didn’t say it would be easy) of achieving the Extraordinary Life would work, using C.J.’s example in the book (for a CEO of a manufacturing company whose company morale is at an all-time low and there is the threat of losing their best customers). The CEO has gone through and answered all of C.J.’s questions that has helped him generate his goals for the Extraordinary Life. Now he begins on behavior change and habit formation:

1. Work on only one behavior change or new habit formation at a time, utilizing just one strategy.

2. Answer each of these three questions in turn:
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Provocative Book Offers Advice Businesses Can Benefit From

Tuesday, January 11th, 2011

The title of John Cohoat’s book, “No Thank You Mr. President,” just by itself got my attention when I was perusing business book titles a few months ago. With a huge mid-term election just around the corner and the economy continuing to be the elephant in the room, this page turner is packed with a different economic message: staying tough, no whining allowed!

The book’s foreword is written by legendary football coach Lou Holtz, and has additional commentary and bonus commentary from marketing legend Dan Kennedy, whose track record of working with successful small businesses is astounding during his 30 plus year career in business.

The subtitle of the book, How Real Businesses from Elkhart County, Indiana Stood Up to Fight and Thrive on Their Own in Spite of the Economic Turmoil, provides a great backdrop as Elkhart, Indiana, known as the RV Capital of the world, has been ravaged by the economic meltdown. Cohoat’s book take an up close look at several businesses in the county and how they’ve adjusted and made it through the economic storm when many others would have folded or ran screaming to the government for financial aid.

As I read through the pages of this great book and the research done by the author and business lessons learned from several Elkhart County firms ranging from RV manufacturers, real estate, to the local bank, I thought of Michigan’s own Michael Moore but with one MAJOR difference. Cohoat’s investigative style via this book shows how businesses press on, reinvent, and resist the victim card. Moore’s assumptions and viewpoint, which are clearly on display in his films and media interviews, consistently portray that free markets and capitalism are the villain and that people are helpless lemmings in the face of the evil corporate machine. It would be a treat to watch Cohoat and Moore debate this book on CNN, NPR or Fox TV. I’m certain it would be fireworks, great for networks seeking a ratings spike and I know I’d definitely tune it to watch these two duke it out.
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