Articles Tagged ‘Allocation of resources’

Planning Today – Surviving Tomorrow

Friday, November 19th, 2010


In the first and second chapters of the book of Numbers in the Old Testament, we find a detailed description of the Israelite campsite during their wilderness trek. To the casual reader an outline of the particulars of encampment might seem to be irrelevant minutiae. What is actually presented, however, is a brilliant model for effectively managing the activities of a large organization. Moses and Aaron were responsible for governing almost a million people. By adhering to a carefully structured plan for day-to-day concerns they were able to prepare for long term problems and issues more efficiently.

Of course, what was true for the ancient Israelites is also true
today. Planning is the key for any business owner who wishes to build a
company that has a solid foundation for future growth and development. Yet,
less than 15% of small business owners surveyed admit that they are doing an
adequate job of planning for the future of their business. In fact,
managers rarely fall short of their real potential for lack of technical
competence. Of all the organizations and businesses I have consulted in the
last 30 years, the one principle cause for failure is the inability or
unwillingness of the executive staff to logically and consistently plan for
the allocation of limited resources – labor, money and time – toward all the
viable opportunities that exist.

While strategic planning is an integral part of maintaining the
growth cycle of a large corporation it is even more critical to smaller
organizations because they, typically, lack the resources necessary to
absorb the cost of mistakes, errors in judgment, or failure to foresee
change. The planning process allows management to evaluate the future where
they want to be and how to get there. It helps them establish goals and
then gives them a performance standard by which to measure themselves.
Better yet, planning allows them a process to identify and resolve problems
before they become crises.

Before gathering your staff together – either formally or
informally – to begin the planning process for the future growth and
development of your company, it’s important to understand exactly what this
vital activity will accomplish:
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