Editorial Category

How I deal with Reality…The List

Monday, February 13th, 2012

ScottManning

I’m going to entertain you today by elaborating on my personal strategies for dealing with reality and giving you a list that I follow. It’s not a complete list to be fair some things just happen at this time I don’t even consciously know or remember.

Also, let me remind you of one of the most critical principles of success…there is
no profit in being a critic, judging, and especially thinking you are any different,
your circumstances, situation, etc – everyone CAN benefit from my ideas in some
manner.

Oh, my stuff isn’t for everyone, and I would encourage you to use my list as
inspiration to customize your own. The major point is – I have a list…like doors
guarding the castle, guns ready to fire, protective spells cast against all
naysayers and detractors…if you don’t have a list you’re at the mercy of anyone
and everyone else ‘out there’.

Attempting to make a complex thing simple; we’re going to divide this into two parts.

First, internally, what you do, for you, for your “reality”.
Second, externally, what you do related to others “reality”.

I believe in self-imposed discipline. That all humans innately have none…except
what they or society forces upon themselves.

If you want to be a high income earner, and certainly accumulate wealth of any
significance, and grow a business, you must put yourself in an environment that
allows you to focus on that.

You’ve heard Brian Tracy’s saying taken from someone else I believe, “what you think
about most is what you become” or something like that.

Well, let’s get clear, what you “do” most will determine your results.
So if you are DOING things that results in increasing your value, growing your
business, making you money, then you will have more of that.

I believe you will be paid exactly what you are worth based on you, the value you
bring, and the environment you put yourself in.

This means REALITY Number 1 – you must invest the majority of your time on that
which you want to “become”. If you want to make a lot of money, you must work daily
at doing only those things that result in you making a lot of money.

You must become more valuable.

I work, not all the time, but more than anything else I do.
I study, invest, plan, organize, strategize, every day, in everything I can, things
that will make the “work” more valuable. Make me better.

I can tell you without a doubt, if you ask most people to tell you what they do MOST
each day, week, month, you will find THAT thing to be center in their reality. And
for most it is NOT their business, not their personal abilities, not making money.

It is amazing to me that many entrepreneurs think that they have freedom to do
whatever they want. No, this is not true. You decided to have responsibility which
gave you opportunity to EARN the right to do whatever you want…the keyword is
EARN.
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Are We Men or Mitochondria?

Friday, December 25th, 2009

Throughout mankind’s history work has been accomplished in a group. Early man took advantage of group efforts in order to fell larger prey. Cooperation was needed when systematic rabbit hunts were conducted.
As chronicled in Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, specialization and division of labor resulted in dramatic improvements in productivity. For example, in pinmaking the division of labor and cooperative efforts of many resulted in the increase of pin production by a factor of a hundredfold or more per laborer compared to a worker doing every part of pin production himself.
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Sirsees and lagniappes

Monday, February 2nd, 2009

Erik Deckers
Guest Editorial provided
By Erik Deckers
www.ErikDeckers.com

Do you give sirsees and lagniappes? Southern in its usage, a sirsee is a small, inexpensive gift that lets the recipient know you’re thinking of them. A lagniappe – a French  word commonly used in Louisiana – is a small little extra given as a thank you. Business people can give sirsees and lagniappes to their customers as a way to  promote and grow their relationships.

Although they’re similar – small, inexpensive gifts – they’re given at different times and for different reasons.

Sirsees (pronounced SIR-see; no one is sure how it’s spelled though: sirsee, sursee, surcy) are sent out of the blue, given unexpectedly. We usually send little thank you gifts to our best customers during Christmas, but what if you did it at unusual times of the year? Send your customers a small sapling on Arbor Day, a flag pin on Flag Day, or a local coffee shop gift card on their birthday. (Vote with your dollars and support your local area merchants!)

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Beware of misconceptions about your business

Monday, December 29th, 2008


By John Gifford
Publisher and Editor

There are two misconceptions about our businesses which we should guard against. First, is my business really what I think it is? Secondly, do my customers perceive my business as I do?

Am I really able to view my business clearly and articulate its business model? Because our business has grown with us, we may be living in the past with respect to our understanding of our company. Construction companies may have been our most important customers in the past, and we may erroneously overrate them now, because of an emotional sweet spot we have for those businesses crucial to our development.

We have a gut-level feel of our business and our priorities for action. It is necessary to add a systematic checklist to generate a more objective view of our business — customers, competitors, most valued assets, etc. This checklist must enable us to examine each part of our business and its contribution to our profits and its specific ROI. The analysis from such a checklist is less prone to historical bias and contamination from an aura about customers we like best.

The second question — how do customers view your business — relates to potential misperceptions of what your business is. Your goal may be to sell items to the affluent, but the message given off by your product and advertising may be middle tier.

We need to ask our customers what message is given by our company, explicitly or implicitly. A questionnaire to past customers or just a few incisive questions to potential prospects may help us pinpoint the mismatch between what we wish our business to be and how it is in the minds of potential or actual customers.

For information on the Business to Business Marketing Seminar to be held by Indy Smallbiz with major sponsorship by PS Executive Center, Inc. and sponsorship by Redwall Live, will take place February 26, 2009. For more information about the seminar, email johng@indysmallbiz.com

I would like to thank Lou Begnel, of FEBE (Entrepreneur Group) for his help in identifying Blogs for reproduction in Indy Smallbiz.

John Gifford can be reached at johng@indysmallbiz.com.

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