Articles by Amy Wortman

Wolf Technical Services, Inc. is awarded $750,000 DOD contract

Tuesday, July 13th, 2010

Indianapolis, IN – Wolf Technical Services, Inc. announced that it has been awarded
a $750,000 contract from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to develop weigh-in-motion
technology suitable for slow-moving passenger vehicles on rough roads.
Under this contract with the Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) Cold
Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL), Wolf will complete development
of a sensor system for determining a moving vehicle’s weight distribution. This
information will feed an independent process for identifying irregularly loaded
vehicles, such as those carrying Vehicle-Borne Improvised Explosive Devices
(VBIEDs). Wolf’s Weigh-in-Motion System (WIMS) will accurately determine total
vehicle weight as well as individual axle and wheel weights of moving vehicles. The
device is intended to be used at military checkpoints and base entrances. Many
checkpoints have a serpentine approach layout for speed control. The WIMS device
measures lateral weight shifts associated with a turning vehicle and uses vehicle
dynamics models to correct for the weight shifts. The contract provides $750,000
for final development and prototype manufacturing of systems that will be tested at
Camp Atterbury. In a previous contract phase, Wolf fabricated and demonstrated an
initial design that proved the accuracy attainable with the system.
“Camp Atterbury is honored to have an Indiana based company test equipment here that
could one day contribute to saving the lives of the Soldiers and civilians who train
here and deploy overseas. Testing at Atterbury – Muscatatuck is a key component of
our vision in that it can be done in a realistic environment and provide technology
that makes Soldiers and civilians safer in any operation,” said Colonel Barry
Richmond, Deputy Commander, Atterbury – Muscatatuck Center for Complex Operations.

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