The difference between Aggitation & Irritation

by Tony Scelzo - November 30th, 2013

If you are in sales & marketing, Dan Pinks book “To Sell is Human,” is a must read. It will help you get along better with others and make you feel more apart of the human race.

Yes it is really that good. I couldn’t tell you how many genius insights I have taken away from this book. I can tell you it is more than I can count. So this either speaks for my to ability to count or my ability to find genius, I am not quite sure.

The first one is the difference between agitation and irritation. In our office we say, “You always have permission to pursue with value”. Meaning if you are serving your prospects best interest from their perception, then you will always get permission to take the next step.

It they need help with recruiting, bring the candidates. If they need help with new clients, bring them referrals. If they need new product offerings, bring them new technologies or innovations. You always have permission to serve or as Dan Pink puts it, to be a “servant seller.”

Irritation comes from someone repeating his or her agenda. Agitation comes from understanding what people’s goals and agendas are so you can help them move closer to them. In doing so they move closer to you.

Agitation acts as the coach, who motivates them to run one more lap, or a teacher who inspires a student to read a new book or even a preacher who challenges you to grow in your relationship with God. Agitation is the push that drives you to make a move. It pushes you progress towards something greater. On the flip side is irritation which pushes you in a negative way. It pushes you to become something about someone else. Take the focus off others and focus on taking responsibility for yourself. Agitate don’t’ irritate.

Tony Scelzo
Stringcan
317.788.5844

Rainmakers Marketing Group
317-216-6345
Tony@gorainmakers.com

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